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Proper "Etiquette" for Canning Exposed Film From a Collapsible Core?


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#1 K. John

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 10:46 PM

Hi everyone.

 

It was great to find this message board...what an excellent resource!  Anyway, I'm curious about the proper procedure for submitting to a lab exposed 16mm film which was housed inside a magazine with a collapsible core on the take-up side.  I've worked with mags that use plastic cores on the take-up side but have never unloaded exposed film from a mag with a collapsible core. 

 

I read somewhere that after unloading the exposed film and placing it inside the plastic bag, it's customary to drop a plastic core inside the bag in the center of the film reel before canning it.  Apparently the diameter of the collapsible core is slightly larger than that of a plastic core, so the plastic core should drop in easily.  Not having canned exposed film coming off a collapsible core, though, I'm not sure, so I thought this would be an ideal place to ask.  Also, should a note be made on the can that the film is not tightly wound onto a plastic core?

 

On a related note, do labs usually frown upon exposed film that was removed from a mag with a collapsible core?  It seems to me that when preparing the film for processing in the darkroom, the lab would want the film tightly wound onto a core for feeding into the processing equipment, but perhaps it really doesn't make a difference.

 

Thanks to anyone who can help!  


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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 04:15 AM

Being a motion picture film lab technician I can give you the following ideas.

 

The cinematographer is responsible for the unexposed stock, the exposed film, and the processed original. She/he doesn’t own it, neither does the lab. Normally

 

It is best practice to wind film onto a core. Secure the wind’s end with tear resistant tape. Make the tuck-in on the end’s side so that the tape can be pulled off away. In the case of collapsible camera cores, do place a film core in the wind. Nothing speaks against a revolution of tape around the core for a snug fit. We darkroom workers know that the film may be held in the core’s groove. We don’t like the film being taped on the core. Adhesive can be pressed out the tape and smear. Experienced!

 

Place the wind into a black plastic bag, put the bag with the corners folded under into the original can(ister), and secure the can with tear resistant self-adhesive tape around the rim. Do not write on the label. Do not alter or cover the information on the label. Write on the tape around the can with a felt marker, at least the production’s work title or the cinematographer’s name and the date. White fabric tape for picture, red fabric tape for sound recordings, photographic or magnetic. Also, write the word EXPOSED.

 

Any additional information about special treatment, physical marks (notches or punched holes), and the like belong on the camera report, a copy of which accompanies the film. Identification is by numbers on the tape and the report.

 

If you take several cans to the lab, have the uppermost one inverted in order to protect its label. Then tape the stack together and send it in a box. If possible, scan camera report and send it via E-Mail to everybody involved.


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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 04:56 AM

As a matter of interest, at film school I was taught to wrap the can tape around the mag on loading, then to wrap that tape radially around the can on unloading, so you could tell the difference between exposed and fresh stock. When did that practice change?


Edited by Mark Dunn, 12 March 2014 - 04:59 AM.

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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 05:58 AM

Let’s keep our common sense.

 

 

The manufacturer tape bears information for the cinematographer, emulsion code and batch numbers, perf., winding. What the lab needs to know is on the label.

 

The tape can be aged, loose adhesive force in the fridge and from dust. If a reminder on a mag is needed, I’d chose a piece of gaffer tape, not the film can tape. Throw that away.

 

Fresh tape around a can different from the manufacturer’s clearly indicates a change. He who encloses exposed stock has to note EXPOSED or PART EXP on fresh tape. What mistake can then occur?

 

To me everything should have a forward character. By this reason we always did away with the tape from shoots. All processed film goes into transparent bags and new cans with a lab label. Once an original is finished, the editor secures the cans back with (blue and red) tape (for picture and sound). Internegatives and interpositives get green tape on the cans. Print cans are usually not taped.

 

When you wrap tape radially chances are parts of the label might get torn off. The label should remain intact until processing. Really important!


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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 07:21 AM

We used the original tape.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 12 March 2014 - 07:22 AM.

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#6 Simon Wyss

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 07:52 AM

No one says you mustn’t. Plus I’m in the old world, inclining towards French culture, plus things change.


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#7 Prashantt Rai

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 10:14 AM

white Johnston tape around the exposed can. mentioning length and stock number, etc.

the original tape of the fresh can goes on the mag.

After that you can either throw it away but I just wrap them on my camera cases. feels good.


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