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shooting scenes inside car


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#1 Lars Drawert

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 03:17 PM

hello together

 

it would be great if someone could give some advice on what to watch out when shooting a scene inside a car.

the first scene has to be shot from inside the car with one person in the back and the driver.

the second scene has to be shot from outside looking into the car.

 

when i made a short test this week i saw almost nothing when looking from outside through the window even with a polarizer. so of course i start to be concerned about it now.

so, how to control the reflections of the windows (beside using pol-filters)? what is a good starting point on thinking about the lighting? and so on...

 

thank you in advance for any help.

 

greets from germany

lars


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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 02:33 AM

If the polariser filter isn't working,  you could it a construct a flag over the windscreen, however, beware of the car's slipstream, which could blow it off, so it needs to be securely fitted and strong enough to resist this.

 

Where is the camera going to be for the interior shots?


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#3 Lars Drawert

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 09:21 AM

Hi Brian

 

First thanks for your reply.

 

For the interior shots the cam is supposed to be in the position of the co-driver, paning (thats the idea in script) between the person in the back and the driver.

 

Lars


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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 11:20 AM

Depending on the camera, you may find that location a bit restrictive. Are you planning to hand hold the camera or mount it on a tripod head of some sort?


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#5 Guy Holt

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 09:37 AM

...  i made a short test this week i saw almost nothing when looking from outside through the window even with a polarizer. so of course i start to be concerned about it now.... so, how to control the reflections of the windows (beside using pol-filters)? what is a good starting point on thinking about the lighting? and so on...

 

 

The problem is that you are shooting into a black hole. When glass is backed by black it becomes a mirror. You need to both pick-up the levels inside the car (not easily done on a bright day exterior) as well as eliminate whatever it is (usually the sky) that reflects in the wind shield. Below is a picture of how a big budget movie would approach the problem.

 

Car_Rig_Eyebrow_WS_Sm.jpg

 

Note that they have rigged an 8x8 solid out over the windshield so that only black will reflect into it. They are also using a Arri M40 4k HMI with Arrimax reflector (equivalent output to a 6k HMI Par) to pick up the interior of the car. Because all this gear obstructs the view of the driver, but also because it is quite often too much for an actor to act and drive at the same time without getting into an accident, the big movies tow the picture car behind a camera truck.

 

Car_Rig_WS_Sm..jpg

 

A process trailer like that pictured here is probably not in your budget. But, so that your talent doesn’t drive off the road while you are shooting I suggest you go to U-Haul and rent a “car carrier” to tow behind a pick-up truck. A number of commercial productions I have worked on have done this with great success.

 

Car_Rig_w_400W_HMI.jpg

 

I don’t recommend that you try to power lights with an inverter through the car lighter socket. Car lighter sockets are only capable of handling a couple of hundred Watts at most and you usually require at least a 400W HMI to provide fill during a day lit shoot. To run a small HMI you can use a "Battverter" - which is a Battery/Inverter system. A "Battverter" system consists of a 12V DC power source (usually Marine Cells), a DC-to–AC True Sine Wave Power Inverter, and a Battery Charger. Wire these components into a Road Case or milk crate and you can put it on the floor in the back of the car.

 

Here are some production stills that show you two Battverter systems I built to run lights in vehicles at various times. The first is a 750W "Battverter" rig wired into in Calzone case. 

 

Car_Rig_w_750W_Battverter.jpg

 

To maximize the running time on the batteries, I made up a "jumper cable" that we attached to the leads of the pickup truck's battery. That way the engine alternator charged the batteries as they were being discharged by the light. Tie–ing the Battverter into a vehicle engine will extend the running time on your Battverter batteries so much that they may never run out of power.

 

Car_Rig_w_Battverter_into_Truck.jpg

 

The production stills below show a more elaborate 1800W Battverter system that we built to run 16 - 4’  kinos  tubes inside the  airport shuttle bus. Use this  link - http://www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/shuttlemailintro.html - for details on  how we wired it into the shuttle bus.

 

shuttlefilmstrip4.1lg.jpg

(Kino Flo 4x4s  rigged to an exo-skeletal frame of a Shuttle Bus and powered

by an 1800W Battverter)

 

shuttlefilmstrip3.2lg.jpg

(Custom 1800W BattVerter powers 16 - 4' Kino Flo single tubes rigged

in the interior and on the exterior of an Airport Shuttle)

 

When building these rigs, keep in mind that when voltage goes down, amperage goes up. Wire that carries 12V DC has to be much larger than that which carries the same load at 120V AC. For instance to supply 12 volts to the 1800W inverter used on the shuttle bus required that we run 2 Ought feeder to the buses' alternator. Also be sure that

the alternator is large enough to take the load without burning out.

 

Finally, You have to be really careful when choosing a DC-to-AC inverter for film production because there are three basic types of inverters and not all of them are suitable for all types of motion picture lights. For more information on what type of inverters to use with different type of lights I would suggest you read an article I wrote about portable generators that is available online at http://www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/emailnewsletter_generators.html. Since inverter generators use the same three types of inverters, the information in the article is applicable to stand alone DC-to-AC inverters designed for use with batteries as well.

 

If you don’t want to tie batteries into the car’s alternator, you should consider using a small portable generator. But, you don’t want to use a generator, like the Honda 2000, that has a gravity feed for fuel. The size head it can power is limited and the fuel will slosh around and cause the generator to run erratically. I suggest you instead use a generator that has an electric fuel pump like our 7500W modified Honda EU6500is Inverter Generator. The fuel pump assures that not only will the engine receive a continuous feed of gas, but also that it won’t run out of gas in the course of a production day. When used with a 60A transformer/distro, the EU6500 is capable of powering HMIs up to 4k and it is so quiet that you will not hear it in the car with the windows closed. As you can see from the picture below of another rig, it is cable of powering even a couple of 2.5 HMIs for daylight fill.

 

Car_Rig_w_2.5k_HMIs.jpg

A 7500W modified Honda EU6500 powering a couple of 2.5HMI Pars on a car rig.

 

If you have any questions about using inverters or generators, I would suggest you read the article I wrote on the use of portable generators in motion picture production I mention above. Use this link to read it on-line for free.

 

 

Guy Holt, Gaffer, SceenLight & Grip, Lighting and Grip Rental & Sales in Boston.


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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 10:14 AM

What sort of inverters do you like? I notice a Maxx SST 750 in there.

 

Decent, true sine wave types are reasonably expensive and have smaller capacity than the alternative, but some types of lighting are happy with cheaper, simpler types. Not sure how fussy Kino ballasts are.

 

P


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#7 Lars Drawert

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 10:31 AM

@Guy - thanks for the helpful info

@Brian - there are two scenes, the first scene (1 person in the back and one person driving) we are still discussing how to do it, the director wants to have the cam inside the car in the position I wrote and then going out of the car without a visible cut, so we are still starting on how and wether this is possible with small budget -

the second scene is about to be shot from outside looking into the car (both person in the back) -

 

thanks

lars


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