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Colour temparature set up

colour color white balance temperature kelvin

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#1 Erol Mustafov

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 06:27 AM

Hi guys,

 

Trying to find what works best - to dial the colour temp manually on camera or use a grey card for each lighting condition (custome balance)?

I have used both approaches before, my concern is that sometimes the lighting conditions are more complex, like when using combination of tungsten and kino flos, then what temperature do you need to dial? Is it better to balance it on the grey card at the spot where you'll be shooting?

 

Thanks for your help!
 


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#2 Kyran Ford

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 09:24 AM

Your first question you should always ask yourself as a DP is what kind of look and feel you are going for. As a DP, I typically stick to lighting a scene using units with the same temperature (just what I've picked up from more experienced DPs) unless I'm going for a look or feel that should require something else. I'll use a color meter if I'm gaffing and the DP wants to mix color temperatures. I recommend always dialing in-cam. Gray cards are pretty impractical unless accurate and of decent size.

 

Sometimes it's simply a budget issue; for example, say the larger units needed are HMIs when the rest of the scene is lit tungsten, in which case I'll gel those lamps -- not ideal because of lost intensity but it works. This is what I recommend you doing when mixing your tungsten and Kinos (unless you're using tungsten bulbs in those). Otherwise, you can find a balancing point if you're OK with that.


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#3 Erol Mustafov

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 11:35 AM

Hi Kyran, thanks a lot for your advice, this is very helpful!

 

The look we'll try and achieve in most of scenes will be bleak and moody, with high contrasts and shadows and pretty sharp on the skintones, possibly using CTBs, unless the Director wants to keep everything flat and neutral and do the grading in post.

 

In contrast, there will be some scenes with softer and warmer tones, but keeping the overal mood bleak.

 

It looks like I'll have access to HMIs, which might sort out the problem.I will try and also do some tests where possible.

I always wanted to get a Color meter, but normally they are quite expensive unless you know where I can get one for a decent price?


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#4 Kyran Ford

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 11:51 AM

Hi Kyran, thanks a lot for your advice, this is very helpful!

 

The look we'll try and achieve in most of scenes will be bleak and moody, with high contrasts and shadows and pretty sharp on the skintones, possibly using CTBs, unless the Director wants to keep everything flat and neutral and do the grading in post.

 

In contrast, there will be some scenes with softer and warmer tones, but keeping the overal mood bleak.

 

It looks like I'll have access to HMIs, which might sort out the problem.I will try and also do some tests where possible.

I always wanted to get a Color meter, but normally they are quite expensive unless you know where I can get one for a decent price?

 

Yes, if you can, go to locations beforehand and perform any tests needed. This will also allow you and/or your gaffer to solve any potential issues before the shoot, as well as discuss how you are going to light. 

 

Your best bet would be to watch out for a good deal on an older used color meter on eBay or forums. 

 

Glad I could help.


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#5 Erol Mustafov

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 02:33 PM

:) :) :)


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