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How would you light this


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#1 Akpe ododoru

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:13 AM

Can someone please tell me how to get this type of lighten scene.

 

What type of light to use

What power

How many to use

 

The first and second pics are examples of what am looking to achieve.

 

The 3rd pic is the scene am looking to light.

 

Its for a music video

 

 

 

 

Attached Images

  • Example1.jpg
  • Example2.jpg
  • area.jpg

Edited by Akpe ododoru, 06 April 2014 - 10:14 AM.

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#2 John Holland

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 12:49 PM

Well 12/18k HMIs some smoke and not sure what size genny depends on how many lamps you go for .
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#3 aapo lettinen

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 01:55 PM

if shooting at night and the camera is sensitive enough you could manage with two carefully placed 4K:s or 6K:s (one per door, backed off and on spot mode) , although the water reflects the lights so some angles/camera heights are unusable. if daylight scene then I'm afraid the 12/18:s are the only option


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#4 Guy Holt

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:34 PM

Well 12/18k HMIs some smoke and not sure what size genny depends on how many lamps you go for .

 

To get the hard crisp shafts of light in these photos you definitely need to smoke the interior and use a single hard source (two sources will throw multiple shadows.) It used to be the case that only a 12 or 18k Fresnel powered by a diesel generator could create  this kind of look and so it was cost prohibitive for low budget indies or music videos. One of the biggest hurdles was the high cost of blimped studio generators. Not only are blimped generators expensive to rent, but they also come with hidden costs. Since rental trucks like those from Ryder or Penske are not equipped to tow, you quite often have to hire the rental house's grip truck to tow them. And, since most rental houses require that one of their employees drive their trucks (for insurance reasons), the production has to hire a driver at roughly $575/10hrs - which is probably more than anyone else on a typical indie crew is getting paid. But this kiind of feature production value became a lot more affordable for low budget digital productions with the introduction of the new ARRI M90/60 with ARRIMAX reflector. The ARRI M90/60 introduces a new power class for daylight fixtures. Utilizing a 9 kW lamp, developed by Osram according to ARRI's specification, the M90/60 can be operated on portable gas generators, like Honda's new 10kw EB10000, to achieve close to the same results.

 

M90-60-Small.jpg

The light generated by the CAD designed Max Reflector of the new M90/60

is incredibly bright and sharp.

 

Like all M-Series lamp heads, the M90/60 is equipped with MAX Reflector Technology, a unique and very bright open face reflector design that combines the advantages of a Fresnel and the output of a PAR in one fixture. Focusable by the turn of a knob (from 17-55 degrees), the MAX reflector produces a remarkably even light field and a crisp, clear shadow. The elimination of spread lenses, makes MAX reflector lamp heads comparable to par configurations of even a higher wattage. In fact, the M90 is brighter than some 12K PARs on the market. 

 

M90_Ballast_Small.jpg

The Active Line Filtration (ALF) of the new ARRI EB 6000/9000 ballast

makes it an incredibly efficient and clean load.

 

To power the new M90/60 head, ARRI has engineered a dual wattage ballast. The EB 6000/9000 will operate either the traditional 6kw SE globe or the new 9kw SE globe on supply voltages ranging from 195-250V. With Active Line Filtration (ARRI's system of Power Factor Correction) built in, the EB 6000/9000 ballast is incredibly efficient and generates virtually no harmonic noise - enabling it to reliably operate on portable gas generators like Honda's new Digital AVR 10kw EB10000. 

 

EB10000_w-Trans_&_Caddy_Sm.jpg

Honda EB10000 with Voltage Select 84A Transformer/Distro and  14 Gallon Fuel Caddy. 

 

Not only does the MAX reflector of this head provide the output to create this kind of look but it is also incredibly versatile. When you need a lot of hard light for for a shot like this you can lamp it with a 9kw globe. When you don't need quite the punch of a 12kw Par, like on a night exterior, you can swap the 9kw globe for a 6kw globe making more power available to run additional lights on the EB10000. For example, you save 27 Amps when you swap out a 9kw bulb for a 6kw bulb. The 27 Amps you save by burning the smaller 6kw globe will power quite a few more lights when you consider that both the ARRI L7 LED Fresnel and Kino Flo Parabeam 400 use approximately 2 Amps. But, because of the noise it makes you will want to use the EB10000 with a boost transformer so that you can move the generator off set where it won't be picked up on your audio tracks and compensate for the voltage drop you will have over the long cable run (use this link for more information about what can be done with the new Arri M90 and  Honda EB10000.)

 

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lightng & Grip Rental & Sales in Boston


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#5 Akpe ododoru

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 01:18 PM

Thanks for for the reply guys. So lighting it with two 2.5 HMI's wouldn't be powerful enough then.

 

By the way am gonna be filming on the 5D3 Magic Lantern RAW mode.


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#6 Guy Holt

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 05:06 PM

So lighting it with two 2.5 HMI's wouldn't be powerful enough then.

 

One large light at a greater distance will give you harder cleaner edges and better shafts of light with the smoke than two smaller lights closer. What ever you do, do not use pars. They generate sloppy light that won't cut a clean pattern.

 

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting Rental & Sales in Boston


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#7 aapo lettinen

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 04:42 AM

lighting with two smaller lights is possible but that means that the beams have to be totally separated from each other, otherwise you'll get double shadows which looks horrible. that also means you need to have quite punchy lights because they have to be placed quite far from the windows to ensure separation in the interior. placing and moving and adjusting those two lights is more time consuming than using one big light (the two lights have to be parallel all the time and carefully flagged and are more likely to be seen in the reflections etc.) so it's more practical and less limiting to use one bigger light as John and Guy suggested


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#8 Akpe ododoru

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 06:27 AM

Thanks guys....you guys are really cool  ;)


Edited by Akpe ododoru, 08 April 2014 - 06:28 AM.

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