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New UltraPan8 2.8 film "mayday!"


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#1 Nicholas Kovats

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 11:51 PM

 
Presenting my Bolex UltraPan8 film of last year's 4th annual Mayday bicycle charity race for the Bicycle Messenger Emergency Fund found at bicyclemessenger.org. This year's Mayday 2014 race and events can be found here, i.e. https://www.facebook...filter=upcoming
 
 
metadata:
camera = Bolex UltraPan8 2.8 
camera_re-manufacturing = Jean-Louis Seguin bolextech@gmail.com
lens = 5.9mm Angenieux retrofocus 
exposure = T11-T22
frame_rate = 48
film = Kodak Vision3 color negative 200T
film_re-manufacturing = Edward Nowill edwardnowill@gmail.com
lab = Niagara Custom 
scan = John Gledhill bitworks.org

Edited by Nicholas Kovats, 20 April 2014 - 11:54 PM.

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#2 Geoffrey Chandler

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 10:24 AM

I'm an experienced photographer but new to film-making. Can you tell me why you would choose Tungsten film to shoot outdoors? Thanks! 


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#3 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 12:00 PM

Very cool Nicholas, I really like what you are doing with the ultrapan format!

 

@Geoffrey- A tungsten balanced film is easily corrected to daylight balanced by using an orange (85 or 85B) filter. All super 8 cameras have this filter built in, however when you filter a stock for daylight you loose 2/3rds of a stop. For example 200T unfiltered is rated at 200ASA under tungsten light but when you filter for daylight the effective ASA is 125. 125ASA can be very useful in certain daylight conditions. A daylight balanced stock can be filtered for tungsten balance with a blue (85A) filter in which you also loose 2/3rds of a stop. Since daylight films are generally slower, loosing 2/3rds is often not useful. For example 50D is only 32ASA if filtered to tungsten. 200T filtered for daylight with a 125ASA is still very useful, but 50D filtered for tungsten at 32ASA is not.


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#4 Geoffrey Chandler

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 01:53 PM

I guess I'm trying to understand why you'd take a film with the wrong color balance - correct it - lose speed - have bigger grain - when you could have used something like 50 Daylight film?


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#5 Nicholas Kovats

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:00 PM

Thank you, Anthony. Do you reside in Germany by the way? 

Very cool Nicholas, I really like what you are doing with the ultrapan format!

 

 


Edited by Nicholas Kovats, 11 June 2014 - 12:00 PM.

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#6 Nicholas Kovats

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:21 PM

Geoffrey,

 

It's a matter of resources. 

 

One cannot readily purchase any film stock for the UltraPan8 film format. It specifically utilizes Regular 8 double perf stock for many reasons. You can find out why on the UP8 Facebook page under the About tab, i.e. facebook.com/UltraPan8WidescreenFilm. 

 

The 16mm Kodak V3 200T color negative stock had been previously custom ordered and purchased by another UP8 user in Canada. Then shipped to the UK to be custom re-manufactured by Edward Nowill as per my metadata above. This user also had custom  V3 500T R8 on hand. Those were my choices in stock and I am tired of shooting the restrictive latitude of color reversal.   

 

Is the slight color correction and "grain" detrimental toward proper viewing of the film? Constructive technical critiques are fine. I am not made of jello. But there may be traces of silver halide in my blood.  


Edited by Nicholas Kovats, 11 June 2014 - 12:22 PM.

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#7 Geoffrey Chandler

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:27 PM

Geoffrey,

 

It's a matter of resources. 

 

One cannot readily purchase any film stock for the UltraPan8 film format. It specifically utilizes Regular 8 double perf stock for many reasons. You can find out why on the UP8 Facebook page under the About tab, i.e. facebook.com/UltraPan8WidescreenFilm. 

 

The 16mm Kodak V3 200T color negative stock had been previously custom ordered and purchased by another UP8 user in Canada. Then shipped to the UK to be custom re-manufactured by Edward Nowill as per my metadata above. This user also had custom  V3 500T R8 on hand. Those were my choices in stock and I am tired of shooting the restrictive latitude of color reversal.   

 

Is the slight color correction and "grain" detrimental toward proper viewing of the film? Constructive technical critiques are fine. I am not made of jello. But there may be traces of silver halide in my blood.  

Awesome. Thanks for the explanation. 


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