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Unloading my 16mm camera


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#1 Theo Koskoff

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 01:24 PM

Hey I have a Bolex H16 Reflex camera and when I'm done shooting a roll of course it ends up on the take-up spool. When I get it processed, do I just send in the take-up spool or do I have to get it back on the daylight spool somehow? If it's the former, what do I use for the take-up spool from now on? If it's the latter, how do I get it on the daylight spool? This is probably an incredibly obvious answer as there's nothing about it in the manuals, but I'm new to this. Thanks!


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#2 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 02:02 PM

You use a second, empty daylight spool as the takeup reel. You send that to the lab in a light proof container, like the black plastic one the film came in (and it's a good idea to tape the lid closed). Every time you finish a roll, the now empty daylight spool from the feed side becomes the takeup spool for the next roll. If you want to short-end something (i.e. shoot 50' of your 100' roll, and save the other 50'), you'll need extra empty spools and light proof containers. Depending on where you live, you might be able to get that stuff at your local lab.


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#3 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 02:08 PM

Also, just a tip, daylight spools are great because you can load and unload them without a darkroom or changing bag, obviously. But just remember, when you're unloading in the light you will flash the outside few feet of film / the last few seconds on the roll. Not usually a big deal, but if you do unload the film in the dark, you'll be able to keep those images.


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#4 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 09:43 AM

The Kodak stocks on 100ft daylight spools used to be wound using an oscillating motion where the film was moving from left to right to leave no gap between the film and the flanges of the spool. There also used to be (on the negatives) an additional layer in the emulsion that protected against light-piping.

Since these two measures are no longer applied at the factory it is greatly recommended to load the film in very subdued light or complete darkness if you can. Especially if you shoot Super16 on daylight loads. Even a jacket turned outside in will be better than nothing; a changing bag is a good investment and can be handy to resolve camera jams too.


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#5 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 11:44 AM

Yup.  You throw the take-up spool in the light-tight box it came in, tape it closed and send it off to the lab.  You should also put all of your contact information on the outside of the box.  If you have any special instructions for the lab, you should write them up on a separate piece of paper.  Make sure to use industry/technical terms so that they are clear on what you want (e.g., "normal processing," "pushing," "pulling," etc.)  Usually a camera report is sent in with the film and Kodak actually has a good link to an example of one on their site here: http://motion.kodak....ting/report.htm

 

You will need extra spools for the future, but in this case you should just tell the lab that you don't have any extras and that you would like the take-up reel returned with the processed film.  They may even have some extras that they will be willing to give you on the spot.


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#6 Chris Millar

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 07:55 PM

And if you're spooling your own daylights down from 400' you'll notice that your daylight spools are heading off to the lab with your film... Make sure you:

a. Have enough spools for the amount of film you have on the shelf and at the lab.
b. Politely but clearly ask that the lab return your daylights with your developed film.

:)
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