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Need an easy handheld solution


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#1 Mike Tay

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 01:21 AM

Hey im going to be shooting a music vid on what will most likely be a FS700 soon.  I dont have heaps of experience operating, and I will be shooting solo.  This vid will be kind of doco-style, following a couple walking through some nice landscapes, paddocks, forests etc. What would be the best ,easy to learn, way to kit out the camera?  Over-the-shoulder kit I would be fine with but wondering if there is something smoother in-between that and steadicam, which I could get the hang of within just a day of practise?  Obviously its just a music vid, so Ill be just editing the best parts, doesnt have to be super smooth at all times, but just wondering if I can improve on a shoulder rig.  Ive heard easy rigs have a bit of a learning curve. Anything else I should check out?  Thoughts?

 

cheers!

 


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#2 Jaron Berman

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 05:04 PM

What rigging do you have access to?  If you can get an EVF, you're set.  If not, it's doable but more difficult.  Honestly, good handheld will ALWAYS look better than EZ-rig and 10,000 x always better than bad steadicam.  Smoother in handheld is a function of your skill, just as accurate is in steadicam.  If you can build your camera to sit on your shoulder balanced, where you can operate all necessary functions then you're 100% there in terms of the gear.  The rest is knowing what you want, and keeping both eyes open to anticipate.  You'll see lots of people with photos of tricked-out blingy rigs that, in the end, do nothing more for their shots than impress people who don't know better.  Avoid the temptation to bolt/velcro/tape crap to the camera unless you need to.  And there is NO universal setup - if you're handheld, build it so YOU are comfortable doing handheld.  If you're on sticks, build it for that.  If you're back and forth all day, figure out the compromise that works best for whichever situation you're doing more of.  Are you pulling your own focus?  If so, and if you're not using cinema lenses - try pulling focus off the lens, not off a follow focus.  On the cheap/simple end - the gears and FF's are junk and less accurate than your hand on the barrel.  If someone else is pulling for you - only THEN add that stuff and the onboard monitors, etc… -> it's on YOUR shoulder, so carry as little extra crap as necessary to do the job.  You'll NEVER see A-list hollywood cam ops with studio matte boxes for handheld, and they have the luxury of whatever they want for the shot.  Try the lens hood that comes with the lens - and gaff-tape mattes to it if necessary if you're having flare issues.  If you're using filters, try to get screw-on's for your lenses to save weight.  Make your life easier, keep the rig light and balanced and you'll find that it becomes an extension of you - and if you can walk with your shoulders level, the shot will be smooth.  


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#3 Mike Tay

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 07:26 AM

So much great advice there Jaron, super helpful, Thanks so much!


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