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Super 16mm to Bluray compression


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#1 William Mckay

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 09:47 PM

Hello everyone,

I am finally getting great sharp footage back from my camera, lenses and 2k scans (dpx). Thanks to all the help here.  : )

 

The ultimate goal is to get a feature to bluray, but the last several months in the straight-to-bluray testing has been an odyssey. Tweaking and massaging the final grade, sharpening, coloring, de-graining, denoise, adding or subtracting, contrast. In short - I'm exhausted and have an enormous pile of coasters. And enormous respect compression artists.

 

On a few tv's and players I've tried, the image looks great, as it should. On most others, the discs are horrid with electronic noise and artifacts. Could it be that 16mm grain is really a dicey nightmare to deal with?

 

I'm ready to call and get quotes from Deluxe and others, or pay someone to help.  

 

 

 

Anyone have suggestions/similar experiences?

 
 
Thanks in advance for your time

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#2 David Cunningham

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 04:36 AM

Not that it helps much but I know t can be done successfully. The Walking Dead blu-rays are fantastic and that is shot on 500T super16 and purposely made extra grainy for effect. It looks like crap on broadcast tv, but the blu-ray is amazing.

I also shoot super 8 weddings and make blu-rays using adobe encore. Because these films are short (30 minutes tops) I just turn every setting up to max bandwidth to reduce compression issues as much as possible and they turn out great. With 500T super 8, you have a ton of grain.
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#3 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 07:05 AM

I'm ready to call and get quotes from Deluxe and others, or pay someone to help.  

 

This is not a bad idea, to be honest. The tools used to compress the discs you buy commercially start at about $10k. With tools like Encore or other desktop authoring software, the encoding is usually so-so unless you're doing short, high bitrate encodes. The source file you feed into the encoder is a major factor as well. If you're giving the encoder something shot on a dSLR, it's probably going to look pretty bad, especially in the blacks. If it's a high quality film transfer, a good encoder shouldn't have any problem with the film grain. Also, with Blu-ray there are three different codecs you can use for your video. Stick with AVC and you definitely want to do a multi-pass encode to get the best results. If you're using MPEG2, it's only really going to look good at very high bit rates. Nobody really uses VC1, but it's basically equivalent to AVC.

 

Also, if you're planning to replicate the discs, you really want the disc authored on software like Scenarist or BluPrint, since they're guaranteed to produce compliant disc images for the replicator. I think Adobe says Encore can do it, but from what I've been told it doesn't work well and a lot of replicators don't like the disc images it makes. 

 

We use Scenarist and have authored hundreds of feature films on DVD and Blu-ray. We investigated all the cheaper software, but wound up dropping $30k on the Scenarist system several years ago because nothing else was as reliable or produced comparable encodes. Other than it being a nightmare of a user interface, no real regrets about that decision...

 

-perry


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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 02:25 PM

I have made several Blu rays from super 16 on my own and was always pleased with the results I guess each case is different.the footage was in anymore grainy than I expected.
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 02:27 PM

I have made several Blu rays from super 16 on my own and was always pleased with the results I guess each case is different.the footage was in anymore grainy than I expected.
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#6 John Richardson

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 07:44 AM

Encoding to Bluray from Super 16mm is a difficult art.  It is quite hard to keep the exact grain structure, and often some high end noise reduction might be the only solution to soften the conversion.


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