Jump to content


Photo

Avoiding Hot Spots in interview lighting setups

hotspots hot spots interview softbox rifa lighting

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 MICHAEL TAPP

MICHAEL TAPP
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 10 June 2014 - 03:34 PM

Hi All,

 

I recently picked an ex88 rifa softbox to shoot talking heads. I recently tested it out and ran into an issue with hot spots on the subject's face. The silk on the rifa is 32x32 inches and I was also using the eggcrate. The source(1k) was about four feet from the subject. I didn't try using powder during the test. Is there anything else I can do with the softbox to avoid hot spots? Thank you for your insight and time!


  • 0

#2 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3073 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 10 June 2014 - 03:51 PM

What do you mean by hotspots? If you mean specular reflections and shine from skin, then you'll get that from any lamp. You need to use powder to deal with it.


  • 0

#3 MICHAEL TAPP

MICHAEL TAPP
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 10 June 2014 - 03:56 PM

Yes, I am referring to specular reflections and shine on the skin. Thanks for clearing things up for me.  


  • 0

#4 Chad Griepentrog

Chad Griepentrog
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 11 June 2014 - 01:38 AM

Does your kit come with a baffle? That should eliminate any hot spots and spread the light evenly by the time it hits your silk. Is the light fully flooded?
  • 0

#5 MICHAEL TAPP

MICHAEL TAPP
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 11 June 2014 - 11:52 AM

Are baffles another word for egg crates? I have a 40 degree egg crate. I'm thinking of trading in the 40 degree egg crate for a 30 degree egg crate.

 

And yes, the Rifa softbox is fully flooded. Because of the construction of the softbox you can't move the bulb. 


Edited by MICHAEL TAPP, 11 June 2014 - 11:54 AM.

  • 0

#6 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3073 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 11 June 2014 - 03:51 PM

A baffle is typically a second layer of diffusion inside the softbox. I don't think Rifas have them.


  • 0

#7 Mark Kenfield

Mark Kenfield
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1052 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia/Wherever The Wind Takes Me

Posted 11 June 2014 - 08:58 PM

Taping or clipping an additional sheet of diff over part of the softbox can help cut down those specular reflections without affecting the rest of the light too much.


  • 0

#8 MICHAEL TAPP

MICHAEL TAPP
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 11 June 2014 - 11:10 PM

Thanks for the tip! What level of diff would you recommend? I'd like to kill the hot spots without losing too much light. 


  • 0

#9 Mark Kenfield

Mark Kenfield
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1052 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia/Wherever The Wind Takes Me

Posted 12 June 2014 - 11:12 PM

I'd bring sheets of 216, 250 and 251 along and see what it needs. Powder to create more of a matte sheen on people's skin can go a long way for these things though.


Edited by Mark Kenfield, 12 June 2014 - 11:12 PM.

  • 0

#10 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 June 2014 - 06:47 PM

All the diff you add, don't forget, will have the effect of dimming down the light; which often means you bring it in closer, which then takes away a level of it's softness. There is no free lunch.


  • 0

#11 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3510 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 13 June 2014 - 09:58 PM

Another thing you can do is add a 4x4 frame of diffusion in front of the soft box. Try Light Gridcloth. That will make your key light even softer, so the reflection in the skin will be broader and more diffuse.

As Adrian says, you will lose some stop by doing this.
  • 0

#12 Mathew Rudenberg

Mathew Rudenberg
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 252 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 13 June 2014 - 10:05 PM

All the diff you add, don't forget, will have the effect of dimming down the light; which often means you bring it in closer, which then takes away a level of it's softness. There is no free lunch.

 

Bringing it in closer would actually increase the amount of softness - a small frame near by creates the same size light source (relative to the subject) as a large frame far away.


  • 0

#13 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 13 June 2014 - 10:07 PM

Ahh you are correct Mathew. Sorry long flight this morning.


  • 0

#14 Carl King

Carl King
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 14 June 2014 - 12:18 AM

It does sound like the simple solution would be more makeup. And making sure you're not overexposing / clipping the highlights.
  • 0



Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: hotspots, hot, spots, interview, softbox, rifa, lighting

Technodolly

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

The Slider

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Opal

Technodolly

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC