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#1 Albert Goehler

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 07:21 AM

Hello i am now shooting a black and white movie...Imagine an empty dark room with no light ( i mean we cannot see the walls etc..) but only a woman's face.The woman sitting centre of the room and except woman's face,everything is dark. How can i create something like that? 

 

Maybe as an example in the photo,not just like that but a reference maybe...

 

 

using-garage-lighting-for-dramatic-photo


Edited by Albert Goehler, 12 June 2014 - 07:23 AM.

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 06:37 PM

Well you can film in a black walled room- and light them, and control your spill.

often you can use flags (4x4 or 12x12s) to make black walls or Duvatene etc. You just need something matte black. Then in post, once you light to a proper contrast, you'd crush down any information left on the blacks.


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#3 Albert Goehler

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:09 AM

What about doing everything in post? i mean masking or vignetting? 


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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:45 AM

A lot cleaner if you can do it during the shoot and it gives the performer an environment they can sense.


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#5 John E Clark

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 01:04 PM

What about doing everything in post? i mean masking or vignetting? 

 

Masking is tedious, vignetting probably will leave a 'halo'. Sure, you may be able to cut out some large area with a garbage matte, if 'grey' if the area around the subject can be 'crushed' to black.

 

You need about 3-4 stops between the talent and the 'background', and an uncluttered back ground would be 'good', to allow you to adjust the low end of the curve to drop out any residual 'dark objects'.

 

If 'money' is a problem for expensive photo backdrops, black sheets from Target/Walmart or similar department stores will work if doubled up (if one is shooting in the ordinary apartment/house that has light/white walls.).

 

As mentioned, controlling the light so it is only on the subject, and there is no 'bounce' will also add to the 'in camera contrast'.


Edited by jeclark2006, 07 July 2014 - 01:06 PM.

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#6 John E Clark

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 01:05 PM

dupped post...

 


Edited by jeclark2006, 07 July 2014 - 01:06 PM.

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#7 David Landau

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 08:52 PM

Hello Albert,

 

If you want the puddle of light look yu have to add what we often call "negative fil". that is adding 4x4 black flags to cut as much spill off the background as possible as well as putting black cloth on the floor.  I'm one of the gaffers on Project RunwayAllstars and when I had to set up the interview lighting rooms, I had the grips tape black cloth across the ceiling and the sound man put black sound blankest across the floor. The idea is to cut all light off the back ground. The farther to the side you can key light the subject, the easier it is to cut the light off the background in the shot with a 4x4 flag next to the light. You can use black sheets or any black cloth - that isn't shiny - on the walls to stop bounce light from hitting the background. The girl in your photo is lit with one light around 60 degrees off to the right, a little above her eye line and aimed down. Notice that the floor is black so there is no upward bounce of light and no light hitting the background. On runway we positioned the subject as far from the background as possible - at least 18 feet, sometimes 20ft. 

 

This isn't as hard as it appears. Use as a low an ISO as possible and light the subject bright so the background falls away. Distance is always the key. 


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