Jump to content


Photo

DPs shooting a scene with at a single stop


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 M Gallagher

M Gallagher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Canberra, Australia

Posted 17 June 2014 - 04:51 AM

Cinematographers often shoot an entire scene at a single aperture. I always thought this was more of a guide for lighting rather than a hard and fast rule. Could someone enlighten me as to why this would be considered so important a rule.

Thanks
M
  • 0

#2 aapo lettinen

aapo lettinen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1137 posts
  • Other
  • Finland

Posted 17 June 2014 - 05:36 AM

it's much easier to match the shots in color grading if exposure is the same in all shots (differences between shots compensated with actual lighting, not camera tweaking. if you are changing the aperture to compensate, for example, hot window, then you will underexpose your ambience which definitely shows in the final image)


  • 0

#3 M Gallagher

M Gallagher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Canberra, Australia

Posted 17 June 2014 - 06:21 AM

[quote name="aapo lettinen" post="411413" timestamp="1403001380"]it's much easier to match the shots in color grading if exposure is the same in all shots (differences between shots compensated with actual lighting, not camera tweaking. if you are changing the aperture to compensate, for example, hot window, then you will underexpose your ambience which definitely shows in the final image)[/quote?

That makes sense. Thanks

So this means that it is the exposure level that is important as opposed to the physical stop or aperture. If I put in an nd and opened the aperture accordingly it would be the same (apart from DoF of course) or am I still missing something.
  • 0

#4 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3347 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 17 June 2014 - 09:44 AM

It's more important to maintain consistent Exposure than a consistent Stop. If you're lighting the scene there's no reason to vary your stop, unless for dramatic effect. You might not use the same stop for every shot, but generally you wouldn't want matching closeups to have wildly different DoF, for instance.


  • 0

#5 M Gallagher

M Gallagher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Canberra, Australia

Posted 17 June 2014 - 10:17 AM

Thank you Stuart. That is great to hear. And I totally agree about consistency in dof and lighting but I have been hearing that the actual stop was more important than the exposure which made no sense to me but then I kept reading how one scene or another was shot at a particular stop and began to wonder. Anyway thanks again.


  • 0


Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Tai Audio

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Glidecam

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment