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Scene Emulation


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#1 Josiah Prigg

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 10:49 PM

Hey there I am doing a scene emulation off an episode of "Breaking Bad". What are all your thoughts on how to light this shot? Thanks

 

Screen Shot 2014-06-18 at 1.50.42 pm.png


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#2 john spader

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 03:56 PM

looks like minimal lighting to me man. just using the natural brightness from the window and pulling your exposure (f-stop) down to the desired darkness of subject's head gets you 80% there. I see possibly 

2 gentle lights on each side of his head...and maybe 1 light straight down on the desk to other subject in chair. Thats it!


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#3 Jeff L'Heureux

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 04:41 PM

Looks to me like the screen-right side of his head is lit with a light behind a silk about 10 feet away, and the screen left side is just a bounce card just off camera from that same source creating a subtle soft edge.  There's probably some negative fill near Walt's head just off camera to create the darker black in the center of his head as well.  Walt's house interior was built on a set in New Mexico so the illumination on the furniture is overhead studio lighting, and that window is probably lit with some powerful HMI's pounding in to simulate sunlight.


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#4 john spader

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 05:11 PM

Looks to me like the screen-right side of his head is lit with a light behind a silk about 10 feet away, and the screen left side is just a bounce card just off camera from that same source creating a subtle soft edge.  There's probably some negative fill near Walt's head just off camera to create the darker black in the center of his head as well.  Walt's house interior was built on a set in New Mexico so the illumination on the furniture is overhead studio lighting, and that window is probably lit with some powerful HMI's pounding in to simulate sunlight.

Yes. Jeff is correct too!

But I was logically assuming that you would not be building a set so I gave you the "we're shooting at a friends apartment during the day" answer.  haha

Good luck!


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#5 Josiah Prigg

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Posted 18 June 2014 - 09:55 PM

Thanks a lot gouys for your advice, very much appreciated. Just another question about a shot on how to light. How would the lighting work in this one and what type of lens. I am using a Blackmagic Cinema Camera. 

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#6 Jeff L'Heureux

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 01:45 AM

Thanks a lot gouys for your advice, very much appreciated. Just another question about a shot on how to light. How would the lighting work in this one and what type of lens. I am using a Blackmagic Cinema Camera. 

Similar idea here.  A soft key light offscreen on camera left, a few practicals in the background, and a backlight hung on the ceiling shining at the back of Walt's head giving him some edge to cut him out of the background.  The difficult thing to do in this shot would be the backlight, which is a staple of studio work, as this was again likely shot in a studio without an actual ceiling on the set.  That backlight is more difficult to pull off on a practical location without some grip stands or a way to rig the light to the ceiling.  On a studio set you could pan in any direction, but if you use stands you'd have to lock your frame or risk showing the stand that's holding the backlight.


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The Slider

Ritter Battery

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