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Your Preference for Filming under Fluorescent Light - Daylight or Tungsten Film?


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#1 Karl Lee

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 10:10 PM

Hi everyone.

 

Just curious if anyone might be able to give some tips or advice on film choice when shooting interiors under fluorescent light.  I've been playing with my SR3 and so far all of my filming has been daylight exterior, but I'd like to experiment a bit and try filming some interiors with fluorescent illumination (like inside a subway station). 

 

I realize that different types of fluorescent lighting can vary greatly in terms of color temperature.  Unfortunately, I don't have a color meter, nor do I really want to buy any special filters since I'm just experimenting now, and in the long run, I won't be doing all that much filming under fluorescent lighting anyway.  That said, given the choice between tungsten or daylight balanced film, I'm just trying to determine which of the two would generally be the better choice for filming under fluorescent lighting.  My choices are essentially 7219 (500T), 7213 (200T), or 7207 (250D), so any thoughts would be really appreciated.

 

Thanks!


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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 10:17 PM

It depends upon the floro; but if the floros look "blueish" then go daylight, if they look yellowish, go tungsten. I generally always have gone tungsten for the speed under floros, and they come up green, normally, which also normally is what I'm after. Or, better yet, try 250D and 500T.


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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 11:14 AM

An easy way to check is to bring a DSLR to location and take stills at 3200K and 5600K. You can see how much of a green spike they have. It's not a perfect solution since the film stock will have a different color response, but it will give you a rough idea.
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#4 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 11:23 AM

Your choice of stock will depend on what other uncontrolled color temps are mixed into the scene. If you have daylight coming thru a large window in the background and you don't want it to go blue, then you have to go daylight or tungsten with an 85 filter.

Household fluorescents usually come to two varieties, cool white (blue-green) or warm white (yellow-green). If you go tungsten, cool whites read more blue than green so they look less sickly to me.
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Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

The Slider

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