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Shooting stills with Kodak motion picture film


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#1 Matthew Glover

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 01:46 PM

I really want to do this just to experienment and for the hell of it. I will shoot it using a 35mm still camera. Now I know the processing of this kind of film is different than regular standard Kodak Portra film. Is there any where in particular where I can get this process done? Are there any labs that will remove the back of the film so it can be processed in the right chemicals? Also since I am guessing most films are filmed at a 1/48 shutter speed, is it possible that I can up my shutter speed to 1/60 and still get some nice sharpness and detail? Sorry if this sounds confusing. I also guess I would set my ISO on my camera to 500 since I am shooting 500t?

 

Thanks!


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#2 Heikki Repo

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 01:53 PM

Take a look at this: http://www.cinestillfilm.com/


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#3 Matthew Glover

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 02:04 PM

Take a look at this: http://www.cinestillfilm.com/

Thanks for the link! I am curious why this film says 800T and not 500T like Kodak's website says?


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#4 Heikki Repo

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 02:28 PM

Might be related to C41 giving higher contrast than ECN-2. Might be also just marketing.

 

"Q: How do I rate CineStill 800Tungsten?
A: This film has LATITUDE! The ISO that one chooses to rate this film is dependent on what the permissible light available is. If you overexpose it (100 or 200) it will still retain highlight detail and fine grain. If you underexpose (up to 2000) you will still retain most shadow detail. So long as the shadow detail is preserved, the negative may be scanned to retain the good color and dynamics. Remember, grain separation becomes more severe with less exposure, and less prevalent/smoother the more exposure a color negative film receives (due to overlapping of T-grain technology and the tonal blending of the dye cloud). Many cinematographers regularly have rated 800T at 1000 speed with no push but the ideal ISO to rate this film at will always be somewhere between 400 and 800 without push processing.."


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#5 Heikki Repo

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 02:32 PM

BTW: Please do note these two differences when using CineStill 800 to consider the look you are looking for your motion picture:

a) C-41 processing gives different kind of colors and contrast than ECN-2 processing

B) as it doesn't have remjet, strong lights have halos that wouldn't be there with remjet


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 11:45 PM

Take a look at this: http://www.cinestillfilm.com/

 

Though I'd resurrect this thread and let all of you know that they too have begun a Kickstarter campaign.  It's even more ambitious than Ferrania's!

 

https://www.kickstar...ium-format-film


Edited by Bill DiPietra, 11 October 2014 - 11:49 PM.

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#7 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 11 October 2014 - 11:45 PM

Take a look at this: http://www.cinestillfilm.com/


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#8 John Rizzo

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 05:59 AM

Shooting stills on Motion Picture Negative was very popular through the 80's and 90's. There was a company called Seattle Film Works that would package Negative Motion Picture Film Stocks into 35mm Camera  Canisters. Because it was motion Picture stock you had to send the rolls back to them for  processing,the film had to go through a ECN Bath due to the fact that the film had backing. 

 

Workshttp://en.wikipedia....attle_FilmWorks


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#9 Bruce Greene

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 11:08 AM

5 years ago I knew a movie still photographer that shot motion picture film in his Nikon and processed it at home in c-41. He removed the rem-jet backing with a squeegie after processing. This may be the only way to develop such short lengths now without a movie film lab to do it.
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