Jump to content




Photo

Seven lighting

#seven #darius khondji

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Nossair CHKERBOUBY

Nossair CHKERBOUBY
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Student
  • CASABLANCA

Posted 10 July 2014 - 06:14 AM

hi guys, 

can someone help me understand the lighting in this scene.
how is Freeman's face lit, hard or soft light and where does it come from?is it close to his face?
how the other police officer's face is lit, soft or hard light?

is there an ambience soft light from above?

thank you;

 

Attached Images

  • 7.jpg

  • 0




#2 Nossair CHKERBOUBY

Nossair CHKERBOUBY
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Student
  • CASABLANCA

Posted 10 July 2014 - 06:21 AM

here is the picture


  • 0

#3 Leonardo Brocato

Leonardo Brocato
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Rome Italy

Posted 10 July 2014 - 06:38 AM

I think the only light it's outside the window on the right or an ipotetic one it'a cleary not from above, you can see the dark on the left shoulder of the other police officer.

Maybe can be a white fill on the left but maybe not depends on the contrast you want. Outside i think it's a big light can also be softed in different ways each person but the difference i think it's only made by distance from the light. Using s big light out of the window allows you to control and soft a part of it leaving more output where you want, by putting different tipe of WD or grid cloth or silk or even black solid to create dark zones with soft edges.....

i think

 

Leonardo Brocato

Gaffer

Rome Italy


Edited by Leonardo Brocato, 10 July 2014 - 06:39 AM.

  • 0

#4 Satsuki Murashige

Satsuki Murashige
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3081 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 10 July 2014 - 01:41 PM

Key looks like a large soft tungsten source outside the window on camera right. There's an overhead fluorescent fixture the same color temp as the ones in the background picking up Freeman's right shoulder. You can see it reflected in the black desk lamp. Then there is a soft but well flagged tungsten source raking the back wall from camera left.
  • 0

#5 David Landau

David Landau
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New Jersey & New York

Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:15 PM

Hello Norssair,

 

This is a big budget Hollywood film, mostly shot on sound stages with great sets. It was shot by Darius Khondji released in 1995. From my experiences working on big features and TV shows as an electric, this would be how I would guess it was lit.

 

First there appears to be a chicken coop over both the actors providing a soft down light. Probably built by the grips, I would guess that it had six 650 w mushroom lamps down through heavy diffusion such as 216. It was probably rigged through a dimmer to allow adjusting of intensity.  The sides were skirted to keep spill off the set walls. There could have been two coops, one for each actor, or perhaps one large one that covered them of both. It appears to have ¼ CTB on it to cool it off and make it better match the set dressing fluorescents in the background. A real fluorescent unit, such as a kinoflo, would be too uncontrollable and spill on the back wall and the door frames behind them. Also it would be too high to provide the intensity on Morgan’s back. Chicken Coops provide more flexibilty and directionality - and are rather standard on most studio shot films and TV shows.

 

Each actor has his own key, tungsten from off camera right, approx 90 degrees from camera. Morgan’s light is higher than his head level, while the other actor’s key is at his eye height. Different units, with Morgan’s being brighter and un diffused while the other actors light has lite diffusion on it. I would guess they were both Fresnels. If it had been lit with one large light through diffusion the entire room would be lit with warm, soft wrap. It isn’t. It’s a detective’s office, a work place not a beautiful country home. So shadows were approximate to the storytelling which a bright big source through diffusion wouldn’t necessarily render.

 

There is a light off left hitting just the wall with the dart board which has been top chopped – flagged off the top of the wall. It’s aimed at a steep angle into the wall to elongate the shadow of the dart board. It could have also been snooted, or perhaps black wrapped to keep light off the books below.

 

Next there was probably a soft light unit, either a baby soft or 2k zip light just off right of camera, which is illuminating the edge of the typewriter, but also filling Morgan’s face – notice the soft shadow behind his ear. This is probably on a 2k variac and taken down a bit. It was probably flagged off the rest of the set, certainly flagged to cut any spill onto the door

 

Last there is ambient fill that was added to bring up the spines of the binders and the paperwork on the desk against the wall – and to provide some additional fill to the other actor. This could have been a 2k zip with a top chop at just above camera lens height or a 2k open-faced bounced into foamcore. It would have been taken way down on a dimmer – which would explain the warm color temperature on the papers in the background.  


Edited by David Landau, 12 July 2014 - 03:18 PM.

  • 0

#6 David Landau

David Landau
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New Jersey & New York

Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:27 PM

The effect is exactly what the scene was calling for. Morgan is tired and wants to retire and has this one last annoying case. He's worn out - so the lighting in his work area helps to show that. The other cop is half in the dark, literally and figuratively. This lighting helps convey a sort of loneliness also a shabbiness that the film later shows in Morgan’s apartment.  Lighting isn’t to illuminate the scene, but rather to help tell the story – convey the emotional moment of the scene and maintain a mood.

 

David Landau

Author “Lighting for Cinematography”, new from Bloomsbury Press, available on Amazon and at www.lightingforcinematography.com


  • 0

#7 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 18789 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:29 PM

I don't think the soft overhead light is from a coop, you can see it reflected in the black desk lamp and it looks to be the same fluorescent fixtures mounted to the ceiling in the background room.  They seem to be running horizontally to the frame and could have easily been teased with a black skirt to add to the fall-off on the back wall.  On the other hand, considering the silver retention process used to increase contrast in the prints, and digitally recreated for the home video master, the fall-off from soft sources would have been increased and perhaps a skirt was not necessary to make the background wall go darker.

 

The glow on the left could be created with a movie lamp, diffused and flagged... or perhaps there is just a practical lamp with a shade creating the glow.  

 

Both actors are lit from the window on the right, but since the windows have multiple panes and framework, there is no way to know whether one big soft source was used, broken up by the windows, or individual soft lights for each window section.

 

Considering what a fan of Kinoflos the cinematographer was, I wouldn't be surprised if a number of elements involved them.  There may be some very weak direct fill from a Kino, for example.  Or judging again from the telltale reflection in the desk lamp, it looks like a light was bounced into the wall to the right of the window to increase the wrap of the window light into the shadow side of Morgan Freeman.

 

When Janusz Kaminski did "Amistad" using a silver retention process, he mentioned in articles how the increase in contrast allowed him to use soft sources with less flagging because of the increase in fall-off. 


  • 0

#8 David Landau

David Landau
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 87 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New Jersey & New York

Posted 12 July 2014 - 03:44 PM

Hi David,

 

You're right, based on the reflection in the desk lamp, it does look like they used two lamp flourescents somehwere above. I was looking at the reflection on the top back of the chair which sort of looks like four lamps through a chicken coop.

 

That's really interesting about the fall off through the silver retention process.  Just enjoyed your work on Extant.  Just saw the first episode last night.  And thanks for answering questions for my book. It just came out.  I need to send you a copy.


  • 0

#9 Nossair CHKERBOUBY

Nossair CHKERBOUBY
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Student
  • CASABLANCA

Posted 12 July 2014 - 04:35 PM

Thank you guys for all your answers.
ps: mr mullen i just ordered "cinematography" and "film lighting" (can't find them in my country) hope they'll be useful for my light learning.
 


  • 0

#10 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 18789 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 July 2014 - 05:01 PM

And thanks for answering questions for my book. It just came out.  I need to send you a copy.

 

I just bought one on Amazon -- congrats on the book!


  • 0


The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

CineTape

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Pro 8mm

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Zylight

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Zylight

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

The Slider

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Pro 8mm