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difference between film


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#1 Nossair CHKERBOUBY

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 08:15 AM

hey guys,

can you tell me if the film used for still photography is the same as film used in cinematography.

cheers


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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 09:26 AM

It isn't identical, but the basic technology is the same.

 

The main difference is that cinematographic film has a black layer on the back, which is intended to prevent light going all the way through the film and bouncing off metal parts inside the camera, a problem called halation. Older films didn't have this layer and this is the result, which you can see in some old movies:

 

Fig-98-Halation-in-Print.jpg

 

Stills film does not have the anti-halation layer. If you purchase bulk stills film, you can use it in a motion picture camera, but it may cause this problem. The perforations are also a slightly different shape and there may be a slight instability issue.

 

You can use motion picture film in a stills camera, but you must use a special processing step to remove the anti-halation layer. If you don't, it can come off in other stages of the development process and contaminate the chemistry. Particularly, you must not submit motion picture film for processing in a commercial stills laboratory - you can damage their equipment and other people's films.

 

You can find out how to remove the anti-halation backing from motion picture film if you intend to do your own processing in a darkroom - google for info.

 

P


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#3 John E Clark

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 12:21 PM


You can use motion picture film in a stills camera, but you must use a special processing step to remove the anti-halation layer. If you don't, it can come off in other stages of the development process and contaminate the chemistry. Particularly, you must not submit motion picture film for processing in a commercial stills laboratory - you can damage their equipment and other people's films.

 

You can find out how to remove the anti-halation backing from motion picture film if you intend to do your own processing in a darkroom - google for info.

 

P

 

In a fit of nostalgia I looked into the DIY processing for 8mm Film. It seems to be a hassle... and one method for removing the black backing was 'through the fingers' (buckets of chemicals were also part of the procedure...).

 

For still film use, with the film cut to 2-3 foot lenghths, probably the 'finger' method would work.

 

But one of the comments was, that 'scratches' and remaning black backing could happen to degrade the negative...

 

In a pro lab I think there's a high pressure water jet that removes the backing as the film is carried through the various tanks for processing.

 

One lab that was mentioned for 'still film' processing of movie film was:

 

http://www.fotokem.com/

 

Don't know if they still do this sort of thing any more, or if one has to send them a 'bundle' of negative segments for them to fit the still film into their process.


Edited by jeclark2006, 13 July 2014 - 12:22 PM.

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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 01:42 PM

The heavier rem-jet backing on motion picture negative is not only for anti-halation but also anti-static since movie film moves much faster through a camera than still film.

 

Part of the ECN2 processing for motion picture negative involves the bath to remove the rem-jet carbon, which is why you don't want to send your motion picture film through a C41 still processor.


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