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Aspect Ratio Problem


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#1 Albert Goehler

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 02:26 AM

Hello i shot a movie with my dslr.In the camera settings i chose 16:9 aspect ratio.But when it come to editing i cant export widescreen.What should i do,can i export widescreen in any way?Here is my video media info :

 

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#2 Matthew Padraic Barr

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 02:25 PM

Widescreen can refer to a few different aspect ratios, and all can be achieved by simply cropping the top and bottom of the frame -- assuming you didn't shoot anamorphic or on film, you will not loose image quality by cropping. You're probably thinking of 2.40:1 or 2.35:1 when you said widescreen; this is common. What editing system are you using?
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#3 Albert Goehler

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 02:30 PM

I am using adobe premiere.Yes i shot with my dslr 16:9 not anamorphic.The problem is i didnt think about cropping when i shot this.So if i crop top and bottom,the film would look very bad.Can i do it without cropping the video?


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#4 Matthew Padraic Barr

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 03:27 PM

You need to plan ahead when shooting widescreen for many reasons, so if you haven't, getting a 2.35 or 2.40 after the fact in post isn't ideal. You could crop a very small area and do 185, since you didnt frame for 235 or 240.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 04:17 PM

16x9 is widescreen already, anything wider than 4x3 is considered widescreen.

"anamorphic" in this case refers to standard def video 16x9, which uses non-square pixels to fit a 1.78 : 1 (16x9) image into 720 x 480 pixels (NTSC) for release on DVD where a DVD player can stretch this to fill a 16x9 monitor or make it letterboxed on a 4x3 monitor. Not an issue for online display or HDTV where you can use square pixels for a 16x9 aspect ratio.
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#6 David Hessel

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 05:42 PM

I am using adobe premiere.Yes i shot with my dslr 16:9 not anamorphic.The problem is i didnt think about cropping when i shot this.So if i crop top and bottom,the film would look very bad.Can i do it without cropping the video?

 

Nope, the only way to make it wider than 16:9 would be to stretch the image which I imagine would be even worse. You will have to stick with 16:9 for this one if cropping is not an option.


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#7 John E Clark

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 05:52 PM

I am using adobe premiere.Yes i shot with my dslr 16:9 not anamorphic.The problem is i didnt think about cropping when i shot this.So if i crop top and bottom,the film would look very bad.Can i do it without cropping the video?

 

Chalk it up to experience. Next time, think about the 'croping' to the ratio you want, and make a template to cover your monitor/LCD to indicate where the resulting crop lines are.

 

In the NLE then you would crop to the required aspect ratio.


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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 06:01 PM

So you shot this in 16x9 (1.78 : 1) but you want to crop it to 2.40 : 1?


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#9 John E Clark

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 06:09 PM

So you shot this in 16x9 (1.78 : 1) but you want to crop it to 2.40 : 1?

 

Something that has been in the back of my mind in thinking about 'anamorphic lenses', and since I don't have one, nor really have any plans to use one... just for my own edification...

 

In the olden days, one would shoot film with an anamorphic lens. The resulting image on the negative, and subsequent prints would be 'distorted', but during projection an anamorphic lens would be used, and the projected image displayed with out distortion.

 

How does that work in the digital age, since I thought I read that digital projectors are not expected to have anamorphic lenses.

 

Is there some sort of resampling that corrects for the anamorphic lenses such that when projected via an ordinary projection system, the distortion has been dealt with?

 

Or do digital projection systems correct with some anamorphic DSP 'processing' if the media is so marked.


Edited by jeclark2006, 24 July 2014 - 06:10 PM.

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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 07:53 PM

The 2K or 4K image in the digital cinema package (DCP) is not squeezed for 2.40 movies since the projectors use spherical lenses.  So if you shot with anamorphic camera lenses, the squeeze was taken out during the D.I. to create the DCP and home video masters (it would be left in for the master that gets recorded to 4-perf 35mm intermediate stock so that anamorphic / scope release prints could be struck.)


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#11 Albert Goehler

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 01:34 AM

I think i take my chance 1:85,thanks for all


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