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Common Camera Report Lab Instructions


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#1 James Malamatinas

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 08:10 AM

It's not often that I get to work on 35mm or 16mm shoots but I'm optimistic that it might change! In the  hope of getting more film work I'm just brushing up on all the ins-and-outs of film specific loading.

One of the things that I have little experience of from the few 16mm shoots I've done are the common lab instructions that a loader will end up writing on lab reports for processing e.g. one light print, time to colour chart, push x stops and so forth. 

I was hoping one of the members here with more film experience might be able to list some of the common instructions and what they mean (if they're not completely self-explanatory!). It would be useful both so that I know what to expect and what exactly they mean. 

On a separate note, if anyone has a 16mm / 35mm shoot coming up where there might be an opportunity to load or even trainee, please get in touch. I do have some 16mm experience and have also been spending time in rental houses familiarising myself with loading different mags, I'm really just looking for experience shooting film wherever possible. 

 

 


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#2 James Martin

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:23 PM

Hey James

 

Not seen you in a while, I have a 35mm shoot coming up soon. PM or email me!

 

James


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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:48 PM

This page on Kodak's website spells it out in great detail.  Should be exactly what you need.

 

http://motion.kodak....ting/report.htm


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#4 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 09:09 AM

Depending on the lab you're using, "critical ends" might be a good idea, especially if you roll out while shooting.
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Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies