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Recreating this shot from Inside Llewyn Davis with cheap clamp lights?


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#1 Chiyeung Lau

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:26 AM

Hi guys, I am relatively new to lighting and had a question for you guys. I want to try to create a lighting scenario similar to this scene from Inside Llewyn Davis:

 

As a student and lacking major lighting equipment, I was wondering if I would be able to do something similar in terms of lighting with clamp lights? Though the space isn't as big, I was hoping to use 2 7 foot light stands. The light stand on the side would have a single 150 watt tungsten bulb, and the light coming from the top would have  two 150 watt tungsten bulbs. I was hoping to apply a blue CTB gel on these bulbs, but I am not sure of the strength to use of yet

 

According to ASC magazine, "When Davis is onstage, Delbonnel added two hard sources, a 1K Par 64 pointing straight down, and an 800-watt follow spot from the side, with beams that fell near the actor without lighting him directly. The cinematographer filled the space with smoke to make the dark areas more readable."

 

Am I close at all to the lighting conditions? I understand obviously the lighting levels are different, but what about setup wise?

 

Thank you guys!


Edited by Chiyeung Lau, 30 July 2014 - 01:29 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:39 AM

I'd use narrow spot par bulbs with regular screw-in edison bases instead of ordinary lightbulbs, at least for the ones you want to backlight the smoke with.

 

If this is all your lighting in the scene and you want them all to be blue, you might as well just use a blue camera filter rather than try to gel the light bulbs.


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#3 Chiyeung Lau

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:47 AM

Thanks a lot David, I never thought about that. They're basically flood lights right? I will try and see how they work out! 

 

 

I'd use narrow spot par bulbs with regular screw-in edison bases instead of ordinary lightbulbs, at least for the ones you want to backlight the smoke with.

 

If this is all your lighting in the scene and you want them all to be blue, you might as well just use a blue camera filter rather than try to gel the light bulbs.


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:47 AM

There are the types of bulbs in a sealed reflector dish design that come in wide, medium, spot, and narrow spot configurations.  A 75w narrow spot par bulb would be punchier than a regular 150w household bulb.


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#5 Chiyeung Lau

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:27 PM

Thanks a lot David, I will try it out in a few days and show you how it turns out!

 

There are the types of bulbs in a sealed reflector dish design that come in wide, medium, spot, and narrow spot configurations.  A 75w narrow spot par bulb would be punchier than a regular 150w household bulb.


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