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The lighting in "Hot Fuzz"


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#1 Kevin Stiller

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 12:13 AM

Hi all.

 

I'm a huge fan of Bill Pope and Edgar Wright. I recently re-watched Hot Fuzz and was enamored by the lighting in the opening office scene. The contrast of color between the foreground and background is really pleasant.

 

Any ideas on how Pope may have approached the lighting in this scene? Particularly achieving the warm tones on Pegg. 

 

- Kevin
 

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Edited by Kevin Stiller, 11 August 2014 - 12:16 AM.

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#2 John Holland

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 05:43 AM

" Hot Fuzz" was shot by Jess Hall BSC not Bill Pope !!


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#3 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:53 AM

It's been a few years since I last saw it, but from memory the Police Station bits at the start looked very much like a mixed lighting situation - cool blues in the background, warm pleasant skin tones on actors.

 

My guess would be that Hall possibly lit talent with tungsten, and let the natural daylight hit tungsten stock uncorrected. 


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#4 Kevin Stiller

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 10:05 AM

" Hot Fuzz" was shot by Jess Hall BSC not Bill Pope !!

 

Yikes! I wrongly assumed it was Pope because of Wright's other works. Thanks for the heads up ;)


Edited by Kevin Stiller, 11 August 2014 - 10:06 AM.

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#5 Kevin Stiller

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 10:08 AM

It's been a few years since I last saw it, but from memory the Police Station bits at the start looked very much like a mixed lighting situation - cool blues in the background, warm pleasant skin tones on actors.

 

My guess would be that Hall possibly lit talent with tungsten, and let the natural daylight hit tungsten stock uncorrected. 

 

That was what my gut was telling me, but I feel as though the skin tones don't quite seem the right color. Could it be the film stock aiding that quality?


Edited by Kevin Stiller, 11 August 2014 - 10:09 AM.

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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 11:08 AM

Probably grading as much as anything else. That sort of thing, it's easy enough to isolate the skin tones and treat everything else separately. That sort of very pale turquoise-cyanish sort of look is very fashionable but it isn't something that daylight does very readily, even on tungsten film.

 

P


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#7 Mark Dunn

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 01:10 PM

I wonder when teal and orange will go out of fashion, or is it fetish?


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#8 Albion Hockney

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 01:33 PM

Yea on tungesten film it would be way more blue. both in terms of the hue and depth of color as daylight on tungsten is a pretty strong effect ( stronger then what is shown here)

 

I'm sure they got part way one camera but the tealness I would attribute to grading


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