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Rivas Splicer vs Guillotine Splicer?

splice tape guillotine rivas industry hollywood standard

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#1 Jon Taala

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 12:46 AM

Today In class, my teacher told me that Rivas splicer was hollywood standard. Is this true? I swear I always heard Guillotine splicer was industry standard. Is this just a preference thing? I'm curious

 

Thanks!


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#2 Chris Millar

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 01:25 AM

If I'm not mistaken Rivas facilitates cement, whereas guillotine is for tape (?). I know tape is used lots in projection, but would have thought cement would be more prevalent in editing because the splice is hidden at the frameline.

 

If so, it really depends on what side of Hollywood you're talking about - unless of course you want to find out how many splices of each kind were made in Hollywood in 2014 full stop.

 

Maybe I've got it wrong...


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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 01:40 AM

I could believe that the Rivas splicer was the Hollywood standard since it was invented in 1950 for cutting mag film, so was well established and also manufactured by Moviola who supplied editing machines. They're both tape splicers, with the Rivas using pre perforated tape, while the guillotine punches its own.

 

Although, in the UK every cutting room I've been in had a CIR Guillotine splicer, which has the option of angled sound splices. 

 

EDIT I don't know if there was two versions of the Rivas splicer, I've only seen references to a tape version.


Edited by Brian Drysdale, 05 September 2014 - 01:45 AM.

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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 01:51 AM

I have learnt to love the Rivas splicers. There are models for straight cuts and models for angled cuts in magnetic film.

 

What I like about the Rivas is that I don’t have any of the slugs sticking to the film like with Dr. Leo Cat(t)ozzo’s invention. Plus I’m faster.


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#5 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 03:26 AM

Videos showing differences:

 

 


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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 04:53 AM

Plain tape is inexpensive  (and easier to get, by the look of it).

I haven't used the Rivas but it looks a bit fiddly compared with the CIR. The Rivas predates the CIR so perhaps it just became established before the CIR arrived. Splicers last a long time.


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#7 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 05:03 AM

I guess the ultimate test is throwing the splicer against the cutting room wall and surviving. Something I've heard of a few editors doing when they keep on running into sync and other problems.


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