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Blocking Rehearsal


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#1 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 04:23 AM

I'll be doing a blocking rehearsal for the first time in the very near future.  I wanted to ask just how in-depth these sessions usually are.  Is it basically the same as the day of the shoot without shooting anything? (lighting set-ups, camera set-ups, etc.)  Or is there more/less to it?

 

Thanks for any help.


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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 04:37 AM

I would take this as an opportunity to explore things a lot more with the actors, since you don't have the time pressures of an actual shooting set.


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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 12:33 PM

Are you doing a full rehearsal day on set to work on blocking, or just running a blocking rehearsal before shooting? Obviously with the latter, there is a bigger time pressure and you can't spend as much time working out the scene. Hopefully, the actors have already done their own rehearsals before to work out performance. It's a huge time killer when the director decides that blocking rehearsal is a perfect time to work on the content of the scene with the actors. Naturally there's always going to be a little of that, but blocking is supposed to be a technical rehearsal.

I generally ask for a blocking rehearsal first thing so the director and I can agree on coverage, the gaffer and I can discuss where to place lights, the key grip and I can figure out where to lay dolly track, and the AC can lay down actor's marks and get lens position and heights.

On a full rehearsal day, you might just have the lenses and a directors finder so you can see the shots and not have to set up the camera. A few tape marks on the floor with notes on focal length and lens height are usually enough. If there's complex camera movement and/or VFX you might have the camera there as well to work it all out.
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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 03:21 PM

Sorry I picked it up wrong, since blocking out the scene with the actors on the day is pretty standard stuff. Some directors clear everyone off the set, so they can work things out with the actors and then bring the camera people in. It seems to vary a bit from director to director, sometimes the DP just observes from the sidelines as they work and then comes in at the later stages.

 

It gives the actors a chance to get a feel for the set and where things are happening. How much is involved depends on the time pressures. With real times pressures the wide shots can almost be working as part of the rehearsal procees, with the performances being tweaked as the shots get tighter. 


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