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Achieving a Golden Look


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#1 Adam H. Roberts

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 10:42 AM

Hi guys,

 

I was watching a commercial recently and I wanted to duplicate the look. I was wondering if it was done with filters or just colored in post. Here is the video:

 

 

Even though the video is low res I can tell they have a softening filter of some sort but I'm really more interested in the golden tint. Maybe a warming filter? What kind?

 

Thanks!


Edited by Adam H. Roberts, 15 September 2014 - 10:42 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 11:03 AM

That's pretty subtle in terms of warming, the skin tones are close to normal balance... The feeling of warmth is coming from the tan walls and tabletop, the perfume bottle, the dimmed light bulbs, and the lack of any competing colors. She's wearing black, for example. So with such a neutral frame with a hint of warm art direction, the color timing of the image is just slightly warm and muted in terms of chroma level. That would be easy to do in post color-correction or a bit of warmth could be achieved in the color temp settings on the camera (if digital) by setting it to 3700K in 3200K lighting, for example. Or you could mildly dim the tungsten lamps or use warming gels. But I think you are mostly seeing the color tones from good production design, costuming, and make-up.
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#3 Jerry Murrel

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 04:51 PM

Adam Rogers wrote:

 

"I was watching a commercial recently and I wanted to duplicate the look. I was wondering if it was done with filters or just colored in post."

 

I seem to recall Barger Baglites demonstrating an impressive setup with gold diffusion at CineGear (WLA Veteran's Hospital grounds, ~2005 or 2006).

 

A more affordable option might be to use a gold-colored gel, such as Roscolux #08: Pale Gold

 

http://www.rosco.com...rs/roscolux.cfm

 

As David mentions above, one should pay particular attention to subject and background colors, (in all lighting situations).

 

-Jerry Murrel

Cinevision, AR

Little Rock, USA

 


Edited by Jerry Murrel, 17 September 2014 - 04:52 PM.

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#4 Adam H. Roberts

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 11:31 AM

What about something like this? Being that the ext. shots are so stylized I would assume this is mostly a color grade. Maybe a warming filter in camera?

 


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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 12:09 PM

It's possible that the day exterior work used a filter like an Antique Suede, the director and DP did something like that for "Amelie".
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