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lighting a elevator


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#1 siddharth diwan

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 05:39 AM

This is my first post and need a lot of help. as part of our college project we are making a film on canon XL1 entirely being shot in a elevator, can u guys plz give suggestions on how to and with wat lights can i light up d lift and also other advices if possible ....i'll be greatful
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#2 cruz

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 08:19 AM

This is my first post and need a lot of help. as part of our college project we are making a film on canon XL1 entirely being shot in a elevator, can u guys plz give suggestions on how to and with wat lights can i light up d lift and also other advices if possible ....i'll be greatful

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Whoa seems hard, I considered myself shooting a scene in elevator and came up with idea that it would be the best to have the cabin of the elevator put in the studio and have the possibility to rebuild as needed; removable walls ceiling etc. try to think of cheap way to build it .
As to lightning I would try to keep the original character i.e. soft lights from above I would use kinoflos lots of black paper and flags to help the actors stand out from the background
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#3 Adam Valuckas

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Posted 05 May 2005 - 09:40 AM

We shot in an old freight elevator once, it had wooden walls exposed to the actual shaft. We screwed in studs to the shaft walls and ran power over the central structure. All of lights were located at the top floor shooting down with diffusion. You could use a dimmer to try to keep the exposure the same based on the distance from the camera. (but this is all from outside looking in?sooooo- probably different from what your doing)

I?m guessing but you might be able to remove some tiling or use a speed rail above.

advice-

Mega think out your cords and if they are going to be pulled by any machinery!!

You might want to get a building supervisor to ok your work. The last thing you want is destroy your equipment or damage the elevator itself. Or kill your actors, then they can?t act? silly actors :)
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#4 Ed Moore

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Posted 07 May 2005 - 05:40 PM

If you access to some kino flos you could try removing the tubes from the reflector and hiding some 4 foot tubes in the corners away from the ones you're shooting into. Works best for a "hi-tech" elevator look as you get a vertically uniform light as opposed to top.
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#5 Chris Sharman

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 12:45 PM

You should also investigate a wide angle lens or adapter for your xl1 (unless it's a huge lift!)

JM
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