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HD Monitor Not Showing accurate image


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#1 Derick Thomas

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 08:08 PM

Hi I have a RED One MX question. When I'm shooting in Raw 4.5k Redcode 42, when looking at the image through the HD monitor and adjusting the setttings I'm not seeing what's acutally being recorded. Example, I cranked the iso up to 6400 and shot blow out footage on purpose, the monitor showed perfect good usable image. I'm totally confused about this. Is there a setting I need to adjust or is something turned off or can you see your accurate image settings when shooting in raw. Thanks for the help in advance.

 


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 09:03 PM

What do you mean by "accurate"? Do you want to see how it might finally look or do you want to see all information recorded in the R3D file? Because they are not the same thing.
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#3 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 10:24 PM

Are you saying the image on the external monitor doesn't manage the image on the red camera? It's been a while since I worked with the Red One, but it's possible you have the gamma set to something like 'raw' or 'log' which doesn't reflect the metadata (the iso, the whitebalance)


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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 01:03 AM

Yes, it sounds a bit contradictory -- if you view the "raw" image (which isn't actually raw but converted to color with a gamma applied for viewing) then you shouldn't be seeing how it looks to shoot at 6400 ISO because that's just metadata that gets applied later in transcoding the raw files.  Sounds like you don't want to see the raw view image but something put through a viewing LUT that shows you how it might finally look later with the proper color-correction, etc.  In which case, you'd pick some viewing output like Rec.709, RedGamma/Redcolor, etc., something where ISO & color temperature was applied and the gamma was designed for viewing the image on a monitor with reasonable contrast.

 

I also don't understand how you can shoot at 6400 ISO and know that the footage was blown-out when it didn't look that way on the monitor when you shot it.  It sounds more like it looked blown-out when you shot it but in post, it now looks normalized?


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#5 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 02:26 PM

If you're not seeing the exposure change on the monitor when you change the ISO in camera, then you are most likely in Raw View mode. The image will always stay at 320 ISO and 5000K regardless of white balance and ISO. What you want to see is some variant of RedColor/Red Gamma, which is Red's version of Rec 709 gamma.

If you map one of the user keys above the record button to Raw View (Toggle), you can quickly switch back and forth between Raw and RC/RG.

It's easy to get fooled when moving quickly, even for experienced Red shooters. I was the A Camera 1st AC on a very fast moving Under Armour commercial earlier this year, and the DP (also operating A Cam) was freaking out that the A & B cameras were not matching at video village. He said the B Cam monitor was way off.

I had done the prep and provided matching Flanders monitors so I knew this was unlikely to be the case. Turns out the B Cam Epic was set to Raw View, the B Cam op had bumped one of the user keys and nobody had noticed.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 05:03 PM

The EVF on the Red One had buttons, one of which switched you into Raw View -- drove me nuts, I'd grab the camera and accidentally bump that button and the whole image would change, which at night generally meant everything got darker and warmer because I was going from something like 640 ISO, 3200K with Rec.709 contrast to viewing 320 ISO, 5000K with low contrast.  Eventually we taped over all the buttons on the EVF.


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#7 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 05:24 PM

Yes, that's the thing that drives me crazy about Red in general. With the side handle and LCD, you have something like 15 pre-mapped user buttons that are easily bumped. I waste at least 30min of each prep turning most of them off and setting the few that I actually use.

I should probably just make a setup file for myself to save time but I don't know if it would hold through all the various firmware updates...
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#8 Derick Thomas

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 08:57 PM

Good tips. Thank you so much. I'll play around the the EVF settings to see if that's the issues. I will update you guys as soon as I do a couple of test.

 

Regards

DT


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