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Lighting in Chanel commercial


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#1 Minco van der Weide

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 02:09 PM

Hello,

I wonder how this chanel commercial was lit.



At 0.20 etc at the indoor scenes. It's a very soft light source, but I wonder how I can replicate this look. The lights look very warm, is this done with color correction or did they set a warm white balance?


Thank you!
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#2 Vadim Joy

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 02:59 PM

Different scenes lit differently. Please specify which one you refer to. 


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#3 Minco van der Weide

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 06:35 PM

Different scenes lit differently. Please specify which one you refer to.

The shot at 0.20 for example, it's proberly shot with tungsten lights, but how did they get this look? Large diffusers and "wrong" color balance?
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#4 Miguel Angel

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 07:22 PM

Hi, 

 

You might find the Making of useful.

 

You can find it on the link below:

 

Also, if we are talking about these shot:

 

ScreenShot2014-11-05at00437.png

 

ScreenShot2014-11-05at00448.png

 

It was shot with tungsten lights, probably a big light like a 12K and filtered or bounced or even a Maxibrute, but the quality of the light is super soft. 

The other part (and color) is easily achievable with the practicals, the wood on the right side helps too and I would say that the color on their faces comes from that bounce. 

 

Hopefully some of the cinematographers on here will know a bit more about this! :)

 

Best.


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#5 Minco van der Weide

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 06:24 AM

Hi, 
 
You might find the Making of useful.
 
You can find it on the link below:

 
Also, if we are talking about these shot:
 
ScreenShot2014-11-05at00437.png
 
ScreenShot2014-11-05at00448.png
 
It was shot with tungsten lights, probably a big light like a 12K and filtered or bounced or even a Maxibrute, but the quality of the light is super soft. 
The other part (and color) is easily achievable with the practicals, the wood on the right side helps too and I would say that the color on their faces comes from that bounce. 
 
Hopefully some of the cinematographers on here will know a bit more about this! :)
 
Best.

Thank you! I love the color grading (see 5:50 for the before and after), do you know what's done besides making iT warmer?

Edited by Minco van der Weide, 05 November 2014 - 06:24 AM.

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#6 Miguel Angel

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 03:04 PM

You're more than welcome. 

 

It could be a Coral or a Chocolate filter in camera or it could have been done in the grading stage although I really think it was done in camera. 

To learn more about filters you might want to take a look at these websites:

 

Lee Filters website

About minute 12.

http://www.leefilter...ers#nd-videobox

 

The Kodak Guide - It's very useful!-

http://motion.kodak...._15_Filters.pdf

 

The London Filter Company 

 

Have a good day.


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#7 Nicolas Courdouan

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:36 AM

It could be a Coral or a Chocolate filter in camera or it could have been done in the grading stage although I really think it was done in camera. 

 

Usually, Jeunet develops the trademark look of his projects during the color grading process at the Duboicolor facilities, not in camera.


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#8 Minco van der Weide

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:40 AM

You're more than welcome. 
 
It could be a Coral or a Chocolate filter in camera or it could have been done in the grading stage although I really think it was done in camera. 

To learn more about filters you might want to take a look at these websites:
 
Lee Filters website
About minute 12.
http://www.leefilter...ers#nd-videobox
 
The Kodak Guide - It's very useful!-
http://motion.kodak...._15_Filters.pdf
 
The London Filter Company 

 
Have a good day.

Thank you so much! That's the secret component I think ;)
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#9 Minco van der Weide

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:47 AM

Usually, Jeunet develops the trademark look of his projects during the color grading process at the Duboicolor facilities, not in camera.


What do you think is the major effect? :)
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#10 Nicolas Courdouan

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 06:55 AM

Desaturating the blues while bringing up the reds and greens - the digital equivalent to a Technicolor two-strip process could be a good place to start for an experiment - then adding warm filters such as sepia, coral or orange, or a mixture of those.

 

Of course, Jeunet's distinctive style is also the product of a meticulous work by his production design team, the use of wide lenses, and a somewhat expressionistic approach to lighting, as opposed to a naturalistic one.

 

The ASC article on the photography for A Very Long Engagement gives a few pointers - although I would argue that Jeunet's usual style was intentionally toned down on this film when compared to the more striking visuals of The City of Lost Children or Amélie.

 

https://www.theasc.c...ment/page2.html

 

It also mentions the use of an 81EF filter for some of the trench scenes.


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#11 Minco van der Weide

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 05:18 PM

Wow, great! Thank you so much! Do you think a black mist filter would also help? I want to buy one for a long time, but I wonder if there is any way to replicate that look (withouth looking digital) in post? Because a filter in front of the camera is allways a kind of a gamble if you know what I mean. :)
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