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#1 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 03:54 PM

For experienced operators: How hard do you press your eye to the eyepiece? I just did a short film that involved a whole bunch of pretty quick dolly moves, w/ big pans and tilts, and I had to do extra takes because I simply lost sight of the image, even though I had my eye pressed hard into the eyecup. (We used an SR-3.) Should I back off on the pressure? Would an eyepiece chamois help? Would the eyepiece extender help?
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#2 not valid

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 04:30 PM

J-Ro their is no need to press your eye into the eyepeice hard. most eyepeices have a focus on them so you can change the distance of the display from your eye some really nice cameras eyepeices you dont even need to put your eye against you can veiw them from a meter away if you adjust it correctly. If you cant adjust it, try rigging up a monitor for moves like that so that you can just watch the movements straight off the monitor.
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#3 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 08:16 PM

All cameras with reflex viewing systems (or prism) require you to keep your eye to the eye piece at all times while rolling.

If you don't, you can fog your film from the light entering through the eyepiece.

It results in this odd circular fogging in the center of the frame.

That said, no reason to give yourself a black eye with pressing against the finder.

I believe it?s the Arri BL that requires you to actually push against the finder to open the light trap, quite annoying.


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#4 Dominik Muench

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 08:41 PM

the sr2 has a shutter blind system as well that requires you to press your eye down as well, unless you keep it open all the time, if you want to look through the finder from further away, just put a blac cloth over your head to avoid the fogging :)
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#5 J. Lamar King

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 08:46 PM

A chamois can be a big help. I make it a point to always use one because you get a better seal with lighter pressure and it's much more comfortable.

If you're getting pushed around so hard that you loose the image in the eyepiece you should use video assist to operate. If you don't have video assist try using the long eyepiece without the leveler and hold on to the eyepiece with your off hand. That seems to help me on agressive moves, just don't pull the wrong way on the eyepiece. It's much more natural for your head to stay with your hand.
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#6 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 11:37 PM

Thanks, J. I'll try your suggestions next time out. Also, do you know of a follow focus that screws into the rosette on the camera?
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#7 J. Lamar King

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Posted 07 May 2005 - 12:07 AM

Never used one that screwed into the rosette but I have used a Micro-force controler with zoom and focus as a left side hand-grip for hand-held work.

Edited by J. Lamar King, 07 May 2005 - 12:08 AM.

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#8 Rik Andino

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Posted 07 May 2005 - 12:35 AM

I think this might be the case where:
An onboard monitor be mounted to the camera
And then connected to the videotap...
So you can then closed the viewfinder and operate from the monitor.

It's a bit more complicated set-up but it makes life simpler.
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#9 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 07 May 2005 - 11:41 AM

Unfortunately, video taps have always been out of reach budget-wise. I was asking about old-school, straight operating, looking through the viewfinder of a film camera.

Even if the budget could accomodate one, I'd rather spend the $ on an hmi, or a technician, or a dolly w/ a boom, or a second matte-box ... Something that has a direct impact on the photography.
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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 07 May 2005 - 03:04 PM

Hi,

I've only ever operated a 16mm camera once, and I will strenuously avoid doing so again; I finished the day with a blinding headache down the right side of my head through the necessity of pushing on the viewfinder. I can't imagine how anyone ever believed it was anything other than a completely myopic design.

Phil
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#11 Riku Naskali

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 07:49 AM

Yes, you have to press pretty hard. But you could also open it permanently, although then you have to be really careful about keeping your eye on the cup while rolling.
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#12 Sam Wells

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 08:28 AM

You don't have to push so hard you have a headache, geez. Use one of the camois things or make one.

Press too hard on some shots and you're wiggling the camera, not good.

Don't put a 24K right behind you B)

I've found those Arri auto-closing things kind of annoying, that's just me.

-Sam
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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 08:33 AM

Hi,

I did try slackening it off, but it then fell off entirely, so I thought...hmmm... this is rubbish!

Phil
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#14 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 08:49 AM

Yes, you have to press pretty hard. But you could also open it permanently, although then you have to be really careful about keeping your eye on the cup while rolling.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hi,

Many DP's operate with glasses. If your head is flagging the eyepiece there should be no problems.

Cheers,

Stephen
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#15 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 10:42 AM

Hi,

I've only ever operated a 16mm camera once, and I will strenuously avoid doing so again; I finished the day with a blinding headache down the right side of my head through the necessity of pushing on the viewfinder. I can't imagine how anyone ever believed it was anything other than a completely myopic design.

Phil

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Do you mean that you would turn down a job if it's shooting on film?! I've shot 7 short films on 16 or super-16, and I've encountered the push-open eyecup only once.
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#16 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 10:58 AM

Hi,

> Do you mean that you would turn down a job if it's shooting on film?

I would not be offered such a job, but if I were, I'd have to turn it down for many reasons beyond the eyepiece concern!

Phil
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#17 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 12:00 PM

Hi,

> Do you mean that you would turn down a job if it's shooting on film?

I would not be offered such a job, but if I were, I'd have to turn it down for many reasons beyond the eyepiece concern!

Phil

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Phil,

If one of your regular clients wants to shoot film and you don't please give me a call!

Cheers,

Stephen Williams

www.stephenw.com
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#18 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 02:18 PM

> If one of your regular clients wants to shoot film

Oh, my, is that a flying pig?

Phil
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#19 Nate Yolles

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 03:34 PM

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#20 not valid

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Posted 08 May 2005 - 05:27 PM

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<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



PMSL LOL well said Nate LoL
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