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#1 siddharth diwan

siddharth diwan
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Posted 07 May 2005 - 01:53 AM

for the film am shooting on canon XL1 is it totally neccessary to use a light meter but if i get access to one what settings do i hv to make on that plz guide me on that n if dere will difference in ext n int setting and also plz guide me on how to do lighting in a lift i cant afford to build one but hv permission to shoot in
thnx
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

Laurent Andrieux
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Posted 07 May 2005 - 05:47 AM

You should do a research with the search engine here, bcause it has been discussed here.

As a strating point, you should notive in the camera's specifications that the manufacturer gives you a required illumination for a given stop.

From that, just take a meter, set the required illumination and change the iso settings until you display the given stop above, and you're done.

You could consider the manufacturer is not given the precise value (that actually may depend on the lens ther's on...) so you should make more complicated tests as to better determine the sensitivity of your tool.

You can always compare the found result above to the setting the auto iris gives you an an average scene, lumination being considered average.

If you have a waveform monitor, have a white board lit with the required illumination, open the iris till you get 100 IRE, look at the obtained iris stop.

When you have a couple required illumination/given stop you can either consider the 1,2,4 rule :

100 ftcd, 200 Iso stop =4 or 100 ISO, 200 ftcd, stop = 4 or apply the formula :

N²/t = I.ISO/ 25 where N is the T stop, t the exposure time (1/60s) I the illumination in ft cd, and 25 just a calculating factor, don't ask me why.

But don't forget that since the stop ring is a bit crappy on video cameras (just blow on it it will change the exposure half a stop even though you don't see the ring move)

Set you meter as described above and when it comes to pressing the button, have a good monitor correctly set up and determine the right exposure with your finger and nose. And don't try to know if you are at 5.6 + a quarter or at 8 - a third !

Good luck !
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