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shooting 500t without 85 filter


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#1 Julian Fletcher

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 05:30 PM

Hi,

I want to shoot some indoor scenes of my family over Christmas - super 16mm using Kodak Vision 3 500t and Eterna Vivid 500t. My viewfinder is dim as it is, and I don't want to shoot wide open due to dim light. SO - I am thinking of omitting the 85 filter needed for tungsten balanced film. I assume I can do any colour correction afterwards - is this a good idea? Any watchouts ?

Many Thanks

Julian


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#2 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 05:54 PM

Indoor stuff should be shot on tungsten anyway, unless it's during the daytime and a lot of daylight is coming through the windows. But you're talking low-light, so I'm assuming you mostly want to shoot nighttime stuff / Christmas dinner / etc, so that should be tungsten anyway. If you want to stop down a bit, you can always compensate by pushing a stop during processing.


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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 06:07 PM

Hi,

I want to shoot some indoor scenes of my family over Christmas - super 16mm using Kodak Vision 3 500t and Eterna Vivid 500t. My viewfinder is dim as it is, and I don't want to shoot wide open due to dim light. SO - I am thinking of omitting the 85 filter needed for tungsten balanced film. I assume I can do any colour correction afterwards - is this a good idea? Any watchouts ?

Many Thanks

Julian

 

If you're shooting without any extra lights and only household lighting, you may find yourself shooting wide open anyway even at 500 ASA.  You might consider pushing it a stop when shooting. 

 

You won't need the 85.  As Josh said, you only need that for when you shoot tungsten under daylight.  Even if you have some light falling in from the windows, I always find the blue cast to be a gorgeous look during the winter time.  But that's just me.


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#4 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 06:10 PM

I just wrote some complete nonsense,  thinking he was shooting outside.  While I'm editing I think others have given some answers.


Edited by Gregg MacPherson, 26 November 2014 - 06:13 PM.

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#5 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 06:31 PM

Re-reading Julian's post,  it's hard to know what he is doing.   Shooting 500T inside with daylight and an 85?

 

The thought I wanted to bring up was that film speed and over/under exposure will affect the VF image brightness.  Filters don't, assuming one is adjusting aperture for them.  Quite obvious I know,  but sometimes needs to be mentioned. 


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