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What Kubrick could be doing with today's cameras

kubrick candlelit ISO ASA noise lens tstop

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#1 Adriano Ven

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 07:41 AM

I just watched this video and  tought about the story on Kubrick and the candlelit scenes on "Barry Lyndon".
 
What would he be doing with today's cameras and lenses?
 
Of course cinematographers aren't using f0.7 lenses on day to day basis but, for example, Master Primes and Cooke 5 are pretty bright and camera ISO technology are advancing everyday.
 
With a camera capable of a base ISO 5000 and a Master Prime on T1.3 candlelit scenes would be just the start on the cinematography crative process.
 
What do you think?

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#2 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 08:28 AM

I just watched this video and  tought about the story on Kubrick and the candlelit scenes on "Barry Lyndon".
 
What would he be doing with today's cameras and lenses?
 
Of course cinematographers aren't using f0.7 lenses on day to day basis but, for example, Master Primes and Cooke 5 are pretty bright and camera ISO technology are advancing everyday.
 
With a camera capable of a base ISO 5000 and a Master Prime on T1.3 candlelit scenes would be just the start on the cinematography crative process.
 
What do you think?

The more important point to take away from "Barry Lyndon" is that Kubrick pulled off what everyone is now able to do so easily with technology made for the NASA Space Program. Since he was always pushing the envelope then, it stands to reason that he'd be doing things no one else is with today's technologies if he were alive.

Edited by Bill DiPietra, 03 December 2014 - 08:31 AM.

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#3 Hrishikesh Jha

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 10:17 AM

The more important point to take away from "Barry Lyndon" is that Kubrick pulled off what everyone is now able to do so easily with technology made for the NASA Space Program. Since he was always pushing the envelope then, it stands to reason that he'd be doing things no one else is with today's technologies if he were alive.


What is you guys opinion: Would Kubrick have gone digital? Seeing as he was always evolving and probably loved technology.
but I think the artist in him wouldve return to 35mm. Sorry if this has been discussed on these boards.
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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 10:35 AM

I think the point to take from the Barry Lyndon story is that Kubrick was very willing to explore new technologies if they served his story. So it stands to reason that Kubrick would be using Digital cameras now, if they they suited his needs.


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#5 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 10:55 AM

Funnily enough I was speaking to Larry Smith the other day and he's convinced Kubrick would have tested current digital cameras to exhaustion but would have chosen To continue to shoot film.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 11:12 AM

I think he would've used film primarily as well if only because he wouldn't want anyone later on mucking with the raw files. This isn't to say film has less range in it-- rather that it's more cost prohibitive to rescan film then it is, these days, to re-open a copy of resolve on your laptop.


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#7 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 01:27 PM

Funnily enough I was speaking to one Larry Smith the other day and he's convinced Kubrick would have tested current digital cameras to exhaustion but would have chosen To continue to shoot film.

 

According to Spielberg, he was planning on utilizing digital technologies for Artificial Intelligence had he lived to produce it.


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#8 cole t parzenn

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 03:46 PM

Funnily enough I was speaking to Larry Smith the other day and he's convinced Kubrick would have tested current digital cameras to exhaustion but would have chosen To continue to shoot film.

 

Go on...

 

EWS was lit to 1250, fwiw.

 

https://www.theasc.c...9/sword/pg1.htm


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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 December 2014 - 03:57 PM

I don't think we know what Kubrick would have done -- one argument for him embracing digital is that he wanted to own everything, his own cameras, lenses, dollies, editing equipment, so imagine if he could also do his own post production all the way to release as a DCP without needing a lab?  And considering his attempt to control every aspect of second-unit work, since he didn't like to travel, he probably would have liked the idea of somehow a digital camera transmitting a live image to him wherever in the world it was.

 

Also, I just saw a documentary about "The Shining" where they mentioned Kubrick cutting out the last two minutes of the movie, an epilogue in a hospital, two days after release in the theaters, requiring someone go to every theater and do a physical splicing job to the release print.  Making that sort of last minute change is a lot easier with a digital release.


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#10 cole t parzenn

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 12:26 AM

Other than specialty shots, did he use a second unit?


Edited by cole t parzenn, 07 December 2014 - 12:27 AM.

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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 12:51 AM

Sure he did -- all those helicopter shots in "The Shining", the fall and winter establishing shots of the hotel, the snowcat sequence, etc. were all second unit, shot by Doug Milsome (not the helicopter shots). And then there were all the Africa plates used for "2001". And "Eyes Wide Shut" had some shots done in Manhatten. And he had some pretty elaborate ideas on how he could control what was shot by second unit -- he was thinking of having the Africa photographer for "2001" somehow compose through a grid and telephone Kubrick and transcribe all the details in each grid section so Kubrick could then tell him how much to pan or tilt. It got so complex that it was decided that it would be easier just to go to Africa twice and reshoot anything Kubrick didn't like.
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#12 Josh Gladstone

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 01:35 AM

Not to dispute anything you're saying David, but a childhood friend of mine's father was the 2nd unit camera operator and actually took the helicopter shots. He told me about it once and said despite what everyone says about Kubrick, he was actually very hands-off and they were sort of told to do whatever they wanted.

 

Edit: I actually googled his name and "The Shining" and this article came up: http://www.visual-me...k/doc/0114.html


Edited by Josh Gladstone, 07 December 2014 - 01:38 AM.

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#13 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 02:02 AM

He may have been hands off about the helicopter shots but having just watched two Kubrick documentaries in a row, he was clearly not hands off with most people doing any sort of work for him. Watch the BBC documentary "Kubrick's Boxes" for example...
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#14 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 02:45 AM

I loved that documentary.
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#15 Mark Dunn

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 06:41 AM

'Hands-off' only as far as giving a second unit two months to shoot what ended up as barely a couple of minutes of screen time.

A second a day? That's pretty perfectionist.


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#16 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 10:18 AM

 he was clearly not hands off with most people doing any sort of work for him. 

I've heard stories of him checking the darkroom on the camera truck for dust every morning and of him firing a 2nd AC for carrying a magazine across set without the loop cover on it.


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#17 John Holland

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 01:27 PM

A friend of mine worked at Humphies Labs in London [ Long Gone. Sad] they were processing " A Clockwork Orange " Mr Kubrick many times drove a very large Land Rover to the lab in the centre of London to make sure it got there on time .


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#18 Freya Black

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 03:09 PM

Also, I just saw a documentary about "The Shining" where they mentioned Kubrick cutting out the last two minutes of the movie, an epilogue in a hospital, two days after release in the theaters, requiring someone go to every theater and do a physical splicing job to the release print.  Making that sort of last minute change is a lot easier with a digital release.

 

I'm not sure taking a laptop to every theater to do a quick edit seems all that easier to me. I mean presumably it would require rendering a whole new DCP every time unless the DCP itself could be edited somehow?? It's an interesting question I hadn't thought about! Does the DCP have a playlist of some kind that could help with this kind of thing?

 

On the face of it turning up with a splicer and some scissors seems a lot easier.

 

Freya


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#19 Freya Black

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 04:09 PM

 

I'm not sure taking a laptop to every theater to do a quick edit seems all that easier to me. I mean presumably it would require rendering a whole new DCP every time unless the DCP itself could be edited somehow?? It's an interesting question I hadn't thought about! Does the DCP have a playlist of some kind that could help with this kind of thing?

 

On the face of it turning up with a splicer and some scissors seems a lot easier.

 

I'm being slow, I guess you would only need to make a new DCP and go around copying it onto all the hard drives or even just replacing all the hard disks with new ones might be the easiest thing. The difficult bit would be generating all the new keys for each venue and not getting it all confused I guess.

 

Freya


Edited by Freya Black, 07 December 2014 - 04:10 PM.

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#20 Albion Hockney

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Posted 09 December 2014 - 11:11 AM

He may have been hands off about the helicopter shots but having just watched two Kubrick documentaries in a row, he was clearly not hands off with most people doing any sort of work for him. Watch the BBC documentary "Kubrick's Boxes" for example...

 

 

Jon Ronsons "Kubricks Boxes" is the best.

 


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