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Fluorescing teeth and eye whites--why?

Light wavelength video recording broadcast television

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#1 Richard_Swearinger

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 04:54 PM

During a couple of recent broadcasts, notably "Peter Pan" on NBC, I've noticed some pretty vivid fluorescing from the teeth of the talent. It was most vivid on the actor who played Peter Pan and was even mentioned by a couple of the TV critics. I've also seen the whites of eyes doing it as well. 

 

Do we know what causes this to happen? Is it an effect that is being used incorrectly? Is it something to do with the latest generation of camera sensors? Is it lighting related? Is it a chemical thing—something in the teeth whiteners or tooth veneers that is causing this? Is it only with broadcast-style cameras? 

 

And, of course, Is there a way to avoid it? 

 

Thanks


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 05:01 PM

It comes from using lights with a heavy UV output which interacts with things containing phosphors. Sometimes UV lights are used deliberately in stage shows if the production design employs elements that will glow under them, but it could also just be coming from deep purple-blue stage lights that have a certain amount of UV. That's just a guess.
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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 01 January 2015 - 05:04 PM

During a couple of recent broadcasts, notably "Peter Pan" on NBC, I've noticed some pretty vivid fluorescing from the teeth of the talent. It was most vivid on the actor who played Peter Pan and was even mentioned by a couple of the TV critics. I've also seen the whites of eyes doing it as well. 

 

Do we know what causes this to happen? Is it an effect that is being used incorrectly? Is it something to do with the latest generation of camera sensors? Is it lighting related? Is it a chemical thing—something in the teeth whiteners or tooth veneers that is causing this? Is it only with broadcast-style cameras? 

 

And, of course, Is there a way to avoid it? 

 

Thanks

 

I'm wondering if it may be due to the new fluorescent technology.  I hear that the flicker-rate is twice as fast as it used to be and it caused my mom to have some problems with her eyes a few weeks ago.  The eye-doctor said it is directly related to that kind of lighting.


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#4 Richard_Swearinger

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 11:09 AM

Great stuff. Thanks. Since it's NBC one assumes they're using just plain old Kinos or Lightpanels. But maybe not. The other place I saw this phenomenon was Carson Daiy's eyes on the NBC new year's countdown. I'll poke around for production details and see if I can find out anything.


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