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"Mother Of George" - A " How is this scene lit" Post


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#1 Albion Hockney

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 04:54 PM

This film Mother of George is one of the more interesting films visually I have seen in a long time. Based in realism the film still carries a very heavily stylistic look that speaks very powerfully the films themes and intentions.

 

That said I have been trying to figure out how Bradford Young did a couple of scenes and was curious peoples thoughts. There are two scenes in question. The first is a conversation on the edge of a bed. Through out the film there is a soft blue top light used....the light almost seems to be giving illumination more through reflective qualities of the talents skin then the light it self but either way its just gorgeous. Anyone have any idea what this source might be.....how big and soft it is?

 

then there is also that little warm edge as if coming from the lamp....could this be tottaly practical? given the fact the lamp doesnt look over exposed at all I was thinking it would need to be another source, but I'm not sure ....it is 35mm after all lots of latitude.

 

MOG_STILL.jpg

MOG_Still2.jpg

 

 

The 2nd scene the lead is in the kitchen and walks over to window and sits in the sill where she is super overexposed. I usually hate overexposure like this even when done stylistcally with purpose ....but here it does look really nice and the roll off looks very smooth. I assume there is some filtration on the camera and maybe some more work in the DI on it but Im curious what filter might be used on the camera here. You can see in the 2nd still before she goes to the window there is a lot of halation caused by the filter.

 

MOG_Still3.jpg

MOGstill4.jpg

 

 

best,

Albion


Edited by Albion Hockney, 06 January 2015 - 04:55 PM.

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#2 JB Earl

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 10:15 AM

just a guess, but considering the shallow DOF (wide aperture) the practicals could be responsible-however is see reflections of a 4x4 or something like that in the glasses.  The top light is really the key light though, and I don't see much spill from it in the room.  Maybe a kino 4' with a grid?

maybe Mr. Mullen could "shed some light" on this?


Edited by JB Earl, 21 January 2015 - 10:17 AM.

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#3 Jimmy DeMarco

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 04:13 PM

Firsct scene - practical is on a dimmer so it doesn't blow out.  The lamp shade diffuses the light while the highlights are still retained on the wall behind.  There's a single source overhead the talent with cyan gel on it as key light.  There's probably a solid behind the curtain as well to completely kill any outside fill.  I think the reflection in her glasses is just practical light coming from the hallway, or possibly the lamp relecting off a mirror.

Second scene - Camera lens is very wide open to blow out the background and create a shallow depth of field.  I don't think they did anything else for lighting.  If anything they just bounced a little light back.  They might have used a pro mist filter or something to soften the image more.

My best theory.


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#4 Evan Prosofsky

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 05:05 PM

Mother of George was shot on RED, not film. The genius of Brad!

 

I know from his gaffer TJ he really loves ultra soft top light, for something like the first image I believe he was using kino's but bounced back up into a card or muslin or something equivalent to basically build a book light. 

 

I don't know if he augmented the lamp but if he did it would probably be a mus-ball or chimera pancake dimmed way down, hope that helps

This film Mother of George is one of the more interesting films visually I have seen in a long time. Based in realism the film still carries a very heavily stylistic look that speaks very powerfully the films themes and intentions.

 

That said I have been trying to figure out how Bradford Young did a couple of scenes and was curious peoples thoughts. There are two scenes in question. The first is a conversation on the edge of a bed. Through out the film there is a soft blue top light used....the light almost seems to be giving illumination more through reflective qualities of the talents skin then the light it self but either way its just gorgeous. Anyone have any idea what this source might be.....how big and soft it is?

 

then there is also that little warm edge as if coming from the lamp....could this be tottaly practical? given the fact the lamp doesnt look over exposed at all I was thinking it would need to be another source, but I'm not sure ....it is 35mm after all lots of latitude.

 

attachicon.gifMOG_STILL.jpg

attachicon.gifMOG_Still2.jpg

 

 

The 2nd scene the lead is in the kitchen and walks over to window and sits in the sill where she is super overexposed. I usually hate overexposure like this even when done stylistcally with purpose ....but here it does look really nice and the roll off looks very smooth. I assume there is some filtration on the camera and maybe some more work in the DI on it but Im curious what filter might be used on the camera here. You can see in the 2nd still before she goes to the window there is a lot of halation caused by the filter.

 

attachicon.gifMOG_Still3.jpg

attachicon.gifMOGstill4.jpg

 

 

best,

Albion


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