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Lighting a darkroom


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#1 Mike Cozzi

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 02:33 PM

I am a student, and I need to shoot a scene inside a darkroom that shows a print in the developing solution being developed. What kind of filmstock would I use, and how would I light it? Also, would I need any kind of filters? I would probably work with Super 16.
Thanks,
michael
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#2 charles g clark

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 04:53 PM

Ill be honest- I havent got a clue!
Do you need to show the print developing?

If so (and your mastering video) can you try fading between 3 or 4 stages of a cg image(that being the photo fully developed then maybe brightness-60%, brightness minus 40% and brightness -20%)overlapping the fades as much as poss...

If not use some creative cutting to avoid showing that, maybe shoot high key lighting either with a strong light source on a red gel or maybe even b+w with the red applied as a filter in your editing program.

I dont know if you would be able to get a shot of actual development, maybe with very fast stock as high a safe light as you can go with some forced processing but im sure Mr Pytlak can advise you further.

Hope this helps,

Charles
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#3 cruz

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 05:36 PM

Ill be honest- I havent got a clue!
Do you need to show the print developing?

If so (and your mastering video) can you try fading between 3 or 4 stages of a cg image(that being the photo fully developed then maybe brightness-60%, brightness minus 40% and brightness -20%)overlapping the fades as much as poss...

If not use some creative cutting to avoid showing that, maybe shoot high key lighting either with a strong light source on a red gel or maybe even b+w with the red applied as a filter in your editing program.

I dont know if you would be able to get a shot of actual development, maybe with very fast stock as high a safe light as you can go with some forced processing but im sure Mr Pytlak can advise you further.

Hope this helps,

Charles

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


ever heard about bleacher, make print bleach it and then put it into developer
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#4 Glenn Hanns

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 09:51 PM

I am a student, and I need to shoot a scene inside a darkroom that shows a print in the developing solution being developed. What kind of filmstock would I use, and how would I light it? Also, would I need any kind of filters? I would probably work with Super 16.
Thanks,
michael

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Try to light the room with a magenta light and correcting it red later, this will give you a sharper image on film than using straight red light like those used in a darkroom.
Cheers G.
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:54 AM

Hi,

I'd print the image on glossy inkjet paper (which looks very much like photographic paper) in red and blue then fade from magenta to red light during the shot, shoot it on black and white and print it through a red filter later, or do some other post correction to recover monochromatic red images.

Phil
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#6 Matt Butler

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 04:00 AM

If you need to see the print 'developing' you can try sepia-toning where you bleach a developed print and soak it in sepia toner to make the image slowly re-appear.I suggest you talk to a darkroom technician or qualified photo course person to get more info if you wish to proceed in this direction. This procedure can be done in available light - the process isn't light sensitive like normal B+W developing.

Edited by matt butler, 11 May 2005 - 04:04 AM.

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#7 Bob Hayes

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 06:29 AM

Be careful using red light it focuses differently then white light and often llooks out of focus.
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#8 Mike Cozzi

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 11:33 AM

Thanks to all who answered. The sepia toning solution sounds like a fairly easy remedy and it can be filtered in post.
thanks;
Mike Cozzi
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