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Scanning Still Photo to HD Resolution


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#1 barryagilbert

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 04:06 PM

Hope this is the right area to post to - I have recently completed a 35mm short and transfered to D5. I would like to shoot a few 35mm stills and include them in the final edit (in D5/24p). I'm wondering if anyone knows what the eqivalent scanner dpi would be to get the stills up to a corresponding res (which is 1920x1080 lines, I believe)?

Is this even possible for less than $17 million dollars?

Thanks-
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#2 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 04:25 PM

I would like to shoot a few 35mm stills and include them in the final edit (in D5/24p).

Thats no problem.

I'm wondering if anyone knows what the eqivalent scanner dpi would be to get the stills up to a corresponding res (which is 1920x1080 lines, I believe)?

Yes....

Is this even possible for less than $17 million dollars?

Is that a joke? lol B)

PS) You dont have to get a scanner thats equal to the resolution of HD, as long as it that or GREATER resolution. cause you can always use more resolution or crop the image to lower the resolution to HD resolution.

Edited by Landon D. Parks, 10 May 2005 - 04:26 PM.

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#3 barryagilbert

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 05:25 PM

I appreciate the response but I wanted to confirm that dpi and video lines of resolution have a direct correspondence. Ergo, if I get a scanner that has a dpi of 1980x1200, will that get me an image up to HD spec?

thanks


Thats no problem.
Yes....
Is that a joke? lol  B)

PS) You dont have to get a scanner thats equal to the resolution of HD, as long as it that or GREATER resolution. cause you can always use more resolution or crop the image to lower the resolution to HD resolution.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Edited by bugginboy, 10 May 2005 - 05:26 PM.

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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 05:47 PM

Hi,

No, you're missing the point - there's no direct relationship, and when you think about it, there can't be - DPI is a measure of absolute resolution, the number of samples per inch, whereas an HD frame can be any number of inches across you like and it's still 1920x1200.

Therefore, all you need to do is scan your photo at a resolution which will capture the area you are interested in with a resolution of 1920x1200 pixels. If your area of interest was an inch across, yes, you might want a 1920dpi, or greater, scanner - but I suspect it's probably a lot larger than that. If it's four inches across, a common 600dpi scanner will give you 2400 pixels across those four inches, which is more than enough.

In general terms, it's usually pretty trivial for still photography gear to match and exceed the resolution of high end motion picture equipment, simply because they aren't trying to do it 24 times a second. A friend of mine has a cheap pocket digicam that shoots 2048x1556 frames, the same resolution as a feature film effects scan!

Phil
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#5 Daniel J. Ashley-Smith

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Posted 10 May 2005 - 05:57 PM

You can buy a CanoScan LiDE 80 with 2400x 4800 pixels per inch for about £100.

When it comes to scanning in single negatives, it's extremely easy and cheap. It's a wonder why they haven't yet built a scanner that feeds cine film through it, I mean, from looking at some of the cine film scanners they are ripping you off completely.
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#6 Landon D. Parks

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 01:18 AM

www.myspecialphotos.com - go here, they scan (I think) @ 2000dpi :D
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#7 rndfilms

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 09:54 PM

There is an accessory for the Nikon Coolscan series that will hold 16mm strips.




You can buy a CanoScan LiDE 80 with 2400x 4800 pixels per inch for about £100.

When it comes to scanning in single negatives, it's extremely easy and cheap. It's a wonder why they haven't yet built a scanner that feeds cine film through it, I mean, from looking at some of the cine film scanners they are ripping you off completely.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


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Visual Products