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How's My Lighting


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#1 Ben Griffin

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 12:27 AM

We're getting ready to shoot a youtube video for my company. I've done some test runs and thought I should probably get some opinions as to how my lighting looks. This is the first time I've ever done anything like this so keep that in mind. I've attached an image below. It is basically a freeze of a video clip. It seems to me that maybe I need better light on the hair. Any thoughts?

 

Before.png


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#2 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 12:39 AM

Yup. Maybe just adjust your key light a bit to put more light on his hair like you said. If you have barndoors on there, you may just need to open up the top one but make sure it doesn't spill onto the background.

Otherwise it looks really good for your first attempt.
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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 02:00 AM

One thing you might consider adding is a scratch light, which is a back edge light from the opposite side as the key light. This will create a bright highlight on the shadow side of the hair, cheek, and shoulder (if you want), creating separation against the black background.
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#4 Ben Griffin

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 11:36 AM

Thanks for the tips. I have something like a barn door which I created out of cardboard and foil. However, it was very difficult to get the background black and I'm afraid to adjust the lights as they are now. But it's worth a try.

 

I like the scratch light idea. My space is limited, but I have one open space that would work good for this!


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#5 Ben Griffin

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 01:33 AM

Okay I played with the lighting a bit (as well as adjusted the white balance). Everything I tried to do spilled onto the black background, but after lowering the ISO and moving the light around I think I got it. I would like more hairlight still but if I turn up the scratch light or adjust the key light any, it ruins the black background. Your feedback please.

 

New_Bitmap_Image.png


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 06:46 AM

Definitely better. His hair isn't blending with the background as much as in the first frame.
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#7 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 11:32 PM

Looks pretty good. Easiest method would be to pull the talent further away from the background to limit the amount of spill. Use more light so you can use a lower ISO or stop down, this will eliminate more of the ambient spill.

The best way to completely eliminate spill is to set flags between the lights and the background, but that requires 2 more c-stands and preferable a few 4x4 floppies.
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#8 charlie ricottone

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 01:42 PM

a little bit more hair light might be nice like you said. definitely try using some flags to keep your background black if your having trouble with that. some cheap black board from an office supply store works well. it doesn't have to be pretty. you can clamp or tape it to just about anything. this looks great for your first lighting setup.


Edited by charlie ricottone, 08 February 2015 - 01:42 PM.

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#9 Ben Griffin

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 11:36 PM

Looks pretty good. Easiest method would be to pull the talent further away from the background to limit the amount of spill. Use more light so you can use a lower ISO or stop down, this will eliminate more of the ambient spill.

The best way to completely eliminate spill is to set flags between the lights and the background, but that requires 2 more c-stands and preferable a few 4x4 floppies.

 

Hi thanks for the info. Can you tell me where I can find these flags? I tried to do a google search but didn't come back with anything. Can you maybe provide a link?


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#10 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 08:30 AM

 

Hi thanks for the info. Can you tell me where I can find these flags? I tried to do a google search but didn't come back with anything. Can you maybe provide a link?

 

http://www.bhphotovi...18x24_Flag.html


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#11 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 09:54 AM

Flags are just metal frames of heavy matte black cloth. They come in various sizes. They are used to selectively block light off of objects by placing them between the light source and the subject, usually with a c-stand.
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 February 2015 - 10:17 AM

http://www.bhphotovi...ml/prm/alsVwDtl
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#13 Edward Lawrence Conley III

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 02:13 PM

Put your CITY in your profile. United States is pretty big :)


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#14 Ben Griffin

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Posted 16 March 2015 - 07:35 PM

Put your CITY in your profile. United States is pretty big :)

Okay done.


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