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#1 blkeyed

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:12 AM

ive decided to buy a K-3, and i just got it in the mail today, and i was reading as much as i could about it, and all the good things of course i already knew when i baught it, but i didnt know you could only shoot for 20 seconds ect..

but, my questions are

how do you go about changing the "winding mechanism" to a motorized one?, so you dont have to wind ect?

if i change it into being motorized can i then shoot sound also? how to you make these sound ready, i mean, how can you make it so you can shoot sound on it, what do you recoment for eqquiptment ect

can you shoot for more than 20 seconds? how do you go about this?

im trying to learn as much as i can about this camera i cant afford film school, and i cant buy the books about 16 MM film i plan on getting yet, any information would be helpfull, thank you! :blink:
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:23 AM

It can be converted to run a motor, this is usually professionally done unless you're a great camera tech. The Tobin systems motor is generally the one that is used. This will not be cheap and appears to not be in your budget right now.

As for...

"how can you make it so you can shoot sound on it"

I assume you know that with film the sound is recorded separately? You can't record sound directly onto the film running through the K3.

Audio is recorded via a variety of different recording devices and then synched up with the film in post. That's what the clapper board you see used in movies is for.

R.
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#3 blkeyed

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:30 AM

It can be converted to run a motor, this is usually professionally done unless you're a great camera tech.  The Tobin systems motor is generally the one that is used.  This will not be cheap and appears to not be in your budget right now.

As for...

"how can you make it so you can shoot sound on it"

I assume you know that with film the sound is recorded separately?  You can't record sound directly onto the film running through the K3.

Audio is recorded via a variety of different recording devices and then synched up with the film in post.  That's what the clapper board you see used in movies is for.

R.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



i know its synced in post and all, i just wanted to use the actual voice recordings from the filming and such for the film, and what i should probably use, how much doe motorizing this coast usualy?
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#4 Rik Andino

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:12 AM

Lemme guess...
You're not really a Director of Photography as your title suggest.

Anyways
You can get a Tobin Crystal Control motor here--when available in July.

http://www.tobincine...com/page43.html

It cost around $500 bucks, but you'll be able to run your camera nonstop...
And it will be crystal synch so you wouldn't have trouble synching up the sound
Since it'll be running at a constant crystal speed.

However shooting sound with the K3 will bring some other practical onset problems
Basically the camera is a bit noisy so you might have to blimp it...
So that the mics don't pick up the camera noise while you're shooting.

I suggest you do pick-up a book on 16mm if you're really interested in learning
You don't have to go to film school although it really really and I mean really helps!
If you're around a film school--join up with several film students
Offer to help them in their projects inexchange for knowledge and experience.


Good Luck
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#5 Rik Andino

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:18 AM

I assume you know that with film the sound is recorded separately?  You can't record sound directly onto the film...
R.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Not trying to argue with you or be a smart alleck
(okay being a bit of a smart alleck but not to much B) )

But actually you can record sound onto film...
Some cameras like the Arri 16BL and the CP16R can do single system shooting.
These cameras were made to record film and sound in a single system
At the same time.

Although it's an antiquated practice and no-one does it in profesional filmmaking
It is more than possible to record sound to film...

I however don't know how this is accomplish
But I'm sure someone else here could explain it
Much better than me and more efficiently and much more technical.

Anyways that's it.
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#6 Nate Downes

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 08:23 AM

Before motorizing your K-3, I suggest you first shoot with it. Learn how to work with it. Heck, I've done many pieces using just my clockwork Filmo, which also only has a 20 second run on it. You should learn how to run the camera before you upgrade it.
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#7 Richard Boddington

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 08:49 AM

Yes thanks Rik. I was refering more the K3 since that's what he owns. Adding a record head to a K3 inside that small space I'm sure would be quite impossible and cost who knows how much.

As for blkeyed claiming to be a DOP, good grief that opens a can of worms, you want every one here to list themselves based their ACTUAL experience? Come on :D

In another forum we have an under 18 who lists himself as a "feature film director" so any thing is possible it seems.

R.
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#8 Robert Hughes

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:39 PM

Yes, at one time the CP-16R could record sound on film. This was "mag striped" film which has not been manufactured in years. So the sound head is useless. Nowadays the only way of recording sync sound with film is double system with a crystal synced camera, which the K3 most assuredly is not. The K3 is also too noisy for practical sound shoots. Read about the "El Mariachi" technique for one work-around approach.

The Filmo cameras I shoot with run for 35 seconds a wind, plenty for a short MOS scene.

My guess is that blkeyed is coming from the video world and is accustomed to 5 minute shots. Welcome to the world of film! One of the first things you learn shooting film is shot discipline, watching those dollars roll by with each turn of the crank.

Run, don't walk to your local bookstore and purchase "Cinematography" by Kris Malkiewicz, and read every word of it. Twice. Then come back and we can talk.

Edited by Robert Hughes, 11 May 2005 - 03:48 PM.

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Technodolly