Jump to content


Photo

film fireballs at night


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Bob Hayes

Bob Hayes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1087 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Culver City, California

Posted 11 May 2005 - 07:09 AM

Any tips on shooting fireball explosions at night. I?m shooting 500 asa Tungsten. I?m blowing the front of a large warehouse. It?s tough because It?s hard to pump the light level up. It's an exposure issue. Expose for the fireball the pre-explosion in dark.
  • 0

#2 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3073 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:06 PM

Any chance you can shoot two passes at it? One exposed for the exterior, one for the fireball, then matte them together.
  • 0

#3 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:57 PM

hi there-

not that i've had the pleasure of shooting an exploding warehouse yet, but maybe, despite the tricky scheduling, shoot at dusk-ish? It seems like the fireball is such a brief bit of action that (while you don't want it completely blown out) a couple frames of overexposure wouldn't be worth sacrificing the overall ambience for. Or 2 cameras (you're using a couple I assume?) with the tighter shot stopped down a bit?

If you're shooting 5218 I'm betting it will hold a surprising amount of the highlight detail.

Edited by PatrickNeary, 11 May 2005 - 01:00 PM.

  • 0

#4 Kevin Zanit

Kevin Zanit
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1223 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • LA

Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:15 PM

It is a tuff situation. I have found shooting fireballs; a 5.6/8 will really hold the detail. Hell of a stop to light an entire warehouse to.

I like the idea of doing two passes. The only problem is you may lose the interactive lighting provided by the fireball it's self. I don't know, it may work fine though.

You could try doing an iris pull on one of your cameras, although the likelihood of getting the timing right is low.




Kevin Zanit
  • 0


Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

The Slider

CineLab

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio