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film fireballs at night


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#1 Bob Hayes

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 07:09 AM

Any tips on shooting fireball explosions at night. I?m shooting 500 asa Tungsten. I?m blowing the front of a large warehouse. It?s tough because It?s hard to pump the light level up. It's an exposure issue. Expose for the fireball the pre-explosion in dark.
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:06 PM

Any chance you can shoot two passes at it? One exposed for the exterior, one for the fireball, then matte them together.
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#3 Patrick Neary

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 12:57 PM

hi there-

not that i've had the pleasure of shooting an exploding warehouse yet, but maybe, despite the tricky scheduling, shoot at dusk-ish? It seems like the fireball is such a brief bit of action that (while you don't want it completely blown out) a couple frames of overexposure wouldn't be worth sacrificing the overall ambience for. Or 2 cameras (you're using a couple I assume?) with the tighter shot stopped down a bit?

If you're shooting 5218 I'm betting it will hold a surprising amount of the highlight detail.

Edited by PatrickNeary, 11 May 2005 - 01:00 PM.

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#4 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 11 May 2005 - 03:15 PM

It is a tuff situation. I have found shooting fireballs; a 5.6/8 will really hold the detail. Hell of a stop to light an entire warehouse to.

I like the idea of doing two passes. The only problem is you may lose the interactive lighting provided by the fireball it's self. I don't know, it may work fine though.

You could try doing an iris pull on one of your cameras, although the likelihood of getting the timing right is low.




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Ritter Battery

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

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rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC