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Best 16mm Tape Splicer


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#1 David Cunningham

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 11:28 AM

Preferably the ones you cut and tape all in one swipe with just a roll of tape.

 

Looking Super8 as well.

 

Dave


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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 11:54 AM

CIR.


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#3 Roberto Pirodda

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 12:21 PM

by the way, i am selling one, model "special". PM if you are interested


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#4 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 07:58 AM

I think everyone here used the Catozzo,  like this one.

http://www.ebay.com/...e#ht_720wt_1301

 

Auction ends in 13 hours.


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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 08:27 AM

It's the same make. I paid about £45 for mine a few years ago. Perhaps they are scarcer now. Still over €500 new, though.

Leo Catozzo got an Oscar for the design. CIR just stands for costruzione incollatrici rapide.


Edited by Mark Dunn, 05 February 2015 - 08:27 AM.

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#6 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 12:45 PM

These are good splicers for new film, but I wouldn't use them on older or shrunken material. The tape used by these has no pre-made perfs, so the splicer creates them when you push the lever down - this is perfectly fine on new stock, but on older film it can be problematic. For that reason, we use Rivas splicers for 16mm and 35mm. In these, the film is held down on either side of the splice by only two pins, and one of those pins is spring loaded, so you can put shrunken film in it without fear of damaging the film.

 

The splicing tape is pre-perforated, and if the perfs don't line up perfectly, that's ok for our scanner, but it's easy enough to cut out the excess tape with an Xacto knife if need be.

 

-perry


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#7 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 04:39 PM

The two pins holding the film on the left being adjustable on the Catozzo..just trying to think if this is relevant to the idea Perry brings up...perhaps not.  The spacing of the punched perfs themselves is always the same.

 

To edit (work print or reversal),  it needs o be as easy as the Catozzo,  even if the stock is old.  I did cut some very old but freshly processed stock with mine. No problems for me,  but I may not be as discerning as Perry.


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#8 Simon Wyss

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 02:10 AM

I also prefer the Rivas splicers. They exist in 35 and 16 and make perpendicular or diagonal cuts. You never have any of the cut-out perforation slugs sticking to the film. perforated tapes are available clear and white (for magnetic stock).


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#9 Perry Paolantonio

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 04:32 AM

I agree that the CIRO splicers are easiest for editing. We deal with a lot of archival film scanning, and need to attach head and tail leader as well as performing the occasional broken splice repair. I personally prefer tape splices for these repairs, because you can back out of them by removing the tape (vs a cement splice, which permanently alters the film). In these cases, the Rivas splicers are better because they're a bit more flexible.

 

But again, when editing new film, you can't beat the speed of a CIRO splicer.


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#10 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 11:49 AM

I would also suggest looking at a hot splicer too we use Maier and Hancock ones and even very old stock can be hot spliced.


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#11 David Cunningham

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Posted 07 February 2015 - 01:41 PM

Thanks for all the input everyone. That's a lot of information to help with my search.
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#12 Simon Wyss

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 04:45 AM

you can't beat the speed of a CIRO splicer.

 

You should see me assembling with the Rivas. Quick as thought


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