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Technicolor Dye Transfer Process


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#1 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 11:19 PM

Great summary of Technicolor's dye transfer printing process, courtesy of the George Eastman House.

 


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#2 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 10:27 AM

I've always found the story of the demise interesting, particularly because China acquired a IB printing lab from Technicolor after they were dismantled in the US/UK/Italy. That's how they were able to release "Ju Dou" (1990) on an IB print. I heard from some people that this lab was in operation through the 90s, but that's second-hand information. 


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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 03:03 PM

There was at least some dye transfer printing in the 90s. I showed a reissue of Funny Girl while I was still - just barely - working as a projectionist. Unfortunately, the irreplaceable print chose my watch to fall apart in the projector, and three or four feet of it was destroyed. I felt terrible.

 

P


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#4 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 03:34 PM

There are some great discussions on here about IB printing in the 90s, with Technicolor's smaller-scale machine in Los Angeles. What fascinates me about the Chinese lab is that it was built when the rest of them were dismantled. IB printing makes sense for somewhere as big as China because it's an economy of scale, and unfortunately for Western releasing workflows at the time, a one-month production of the matrices was too long for how many prints were being distributed. 


Edited by Kenny N Suleimanagich, 11 February 2015 - 03:34 PM.

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#5 Carl Looper

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 12:17 AM

Great post Bill.

 

I'm a great believer in history as the great antidote for nostalgia. And the video does this.

 

I find nostalgia horrible. It's an impossible longing for what is gone. For example, one might lament the loss of technicolor and punish oneself, or others, that it was not still with us. But such an outlook is a dead end. Or worse than a dead end. A kind of death wish.

 

History, on the other hand is far more alive. It is a longing for what has not gone: for that aspect of the past which is not lost but survives. And this is accessible. It is observable. One can experience it.

 

The legacy of technicolor are in the films that survive, in the docos such as the one posted, and in all the scattered traces of such.

 

History is what survives.

 

For the nostalgic, we can say the past, in itself, is alive and well in the past. It doesn't need any tears.

 

C


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#6 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 04:32 AM

Great post Bill.
 
I'm a great believer in history as the great antidote for nostalgia. And the video does this.
 
I find nostalgia horrible. It's an impossible longing for what is gone. For example, one might lament the loss of technicolor and punish oneself, or others, that it was not still with us. But such an outlook is a dead end. Or worse than a dead end. A kind of death wish.
 
History, on the other hand is far more alive. It is a longing for what has not gone: for that aspect of the past which is not lost but survives. And this is accessible. It is observable. One can experience it.


Very well said. And in order to move towards tomorrow, one must understand and appreciate what was here yesterday - in ALL WALKS OF LIFE. Regarding filmmaking, I feel a big reason the cinema is in the state it's in is due to the fact that filmmakers possess so little knowledge of film history. I learned what I know by reading on my own because no film history classes were offered in my grad program.

There are a lot of great books & websites out there.

And speaking of websites, take a look at the George Eastman House website. They're honoring Technicolor's 100th anniversary, hence the reason they posted the videos on their YouTube channel. But they have much more. Great stuff.

http://eastman.org/technicolor
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