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500 Days of Summer - Color Filters, Grade?

Color Filters Grade Antique Suede Gold Filter Chocolate Filter Coral Filter Tobacco Filter

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#1 Jacques Koudstaal

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 10:06 AM

Hi 

 

I am in prep to shoot a budget feature that is set in the 80's and present day. I am wanting to give the 80's a distinctive look, something more nostalgic and tending towards the warmer colours. 

 

I found 2 references (refer to attached files) from 500 Days of Summer that I really like and I think something similar could work for my film. Can anyone give me some input on the look that was achieved here? Do you think there were filters used or was it just post grade, or was it possible a lighting thing, or a combination? I know one can't tell for certain unless you were on set but I am hoping someone out there has come across something similar and has a point of view.

 

From what I can see is the blacks are sitting more in the magenta range and the mids and highlights are sitting more towards the orange yellow. Is there a filter that can achieve something similar?

 

I have done a few tests with Antique Suede, Chocolate, Coral, Gold and Tobacco filters. I did the tests at the rental house which did not give me a true reflection of what I will get because the locations, art and wardrobe in the film are quite specific and tend towards the browns, creams and oranges not gun metal grey and white like you find in most rentals. There is unfortunately no budget for me to do a proper test shoot so I am a little stuck. 

 

We shooting on Alexa with Zeiss Ultra Primes, I will have 10 days for grade.

 

Thank you,
Jacques

Attached Images

  • 500-Days-of-Summer-01.jpg
  • 500-Days-of-Summer-02.jpg

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#2 Freya Black

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 11:25 AM

The film was 5205 and 5218 with mostly Primo primes. There was some 5219 for night sequences that were pushed a stop. Those were shot with Zeiss Master Primes.

 

Freya


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#3 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 11 February 2015 - 06:53 PM

I think you can achieve that look fairly easy in color grading. Neither image looks too far off from what you can achieve with straight photochemical printing.
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#4 Jacques Koudstaal

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 12:19 AM

Thanks Freya and Satsuki. i think film would be a winner with this project, seems like the obvious format but unfortunately i will have to make do with the Alexa because of budgetary constraints.
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#5 John Miguel King

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 07:33 AM

The UPs + Alexa combo might be a tad too sharp for the look you have in mind?. In my far from informed opinion, I find Primos to be closer to Cooke and Optimos than UPs. They seem to have a smoother focus falloff than the UPs or the MPs, resolving detail more "caringly". I tend to find German glass clinically clean with the exception of Vantage. x

There's so much "eye of the beholder" in everything I just wrote... :D
 


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#6 Jacques Koudstaal

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 12:16 PM

Hi John, i was planning on shooting on the cooke s4's but i had to cut those due to budget. I did however managed to find an old cooke zoom lens - 20-60mm that i am planning on using for the scenes in the 80's and then the UP's for the modern day stuff. Not sure if anyone has some experience with the cooke 20-60?
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#7 Josh Scott

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 12:50 PM

I would personally say color grading would do the trick


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#8 Jacques Koudstaal

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 01:46 PM

Thanks Josh.

The lens i was talking about John is the Cooke Varo-Panchro 20-60mm T3.1.
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#9 Albion Hockney

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 04:34 PM

ultra primes cheaper then panchros? panchros should be way less at most houses ....as little as half the price I'd guess


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#10 Miguel Angel

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 06:09 PM

Jacques, 

 

Regarding the Cooke zoom you might find these links useful: 

 

http://www.reduser.n...chro-20-60-T3-1

http://brownianmotio...COOKE_20-60.pdf

 

And just as some extra information, the Cook Cine Lens History.

https://www.zgc.com/...look-back-2.pdf

 

Have a good day. 


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#11 John Miguel King

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 05:05 AM

Hi John, i was planning on shooting on the cooke s4's but i had to cut those due to budget. I did however managed to find an old cooke zoom lens - 20-60mm that i am planning on using for the scenes in the 80's and then the UP's for the modern day stuff. Not sure if anyone has some experience with the cooke 20-60?

 

Hi Jacques,

Interesting! I haven't come across that very one. Although provided it's well serviced I see no reason why it shouldn't be glorious. The only thing about that glass that I'd think twice is the trade off between the look and the T 3 limit, and if this is an actual concern to your style come the day of filming. I prefer a fully open wide lens as it adds a little separation.

Still, the ultras are very predictable, which is never a bad thing! The 16 mm in particular is so very very pretty. :D

J


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#12 John Miguel King

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 05:20 AM

ultra primes cheaper then panchros? panchros should be way less at most houses ....as little as half the price I'd guess

Hi Albion,

The S4 are not the panchros. The real panchros, not the mini s4, are mighty difficult to source and go out for a similar price to the S4, at least here in the UK.


Edited by John Miguel King, 16 February 2015 - 05:20 AM.

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#13 Albion Hockney

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 11:05 AM

oh yea my mistake you want the faster ones. that is a whole different ball game!  Mini S4 as far as I know are just rebranded Panchros though same optics.


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#14 John Miguel King

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 12:37 PM

oh yea my mistake you want the faster ones. that is a whole different ball game!  Mini S4 as far as I know are just rebranded Panchros though same optics.

 

That's a common misconception. There are rehoused old school Speed Panchros on the market, from TLS optics, but these are not the Mini S4. The mini S4 are supposedly identical in every measure to the S4 with the exception of the T stop range.

As to why the Mini S4 are called panchros, I've no idea, not sure if it's some marketing move from Cooke or simply a description of the lens' physical characteristics that's then been interpreted as being THE panchros. The Panchros are the 50's Speed Panchros and none others.


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#15 Albion Hockney

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 01:36 PM

ah yea, I think when cook first put out the mini s4's they called them panchros and it confused the hell out of everyone myself included till right now.


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#16 Tyler Clark

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 09:38 PM

I think this look could be achieved pretty well in camera and in the grade with the Alexa. I've done some similar looks in the C300 even. I'd say maybe look into some extra softening to get the effect for the 80's sequences. The Cooke will do a pretty good job but you may find you want to take it further once you see the footage in the timeline.
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