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Getting Haze to settle Outdoors?


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#1 Brandon D. Hyde

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 03:15 PM

Hello everyone!

 

I have yet to find a succint answer to this after looking around for a while. Shots like the one I've attached all have this really beautiful haze being backlight by big, soft sources. I know the general concept of how to light for this and have done it before (without the haze) for night exteriors. Interiors are easy enough as there's no wind or temperature changes. I can't for the life of me figure out how to get the haze to settle (and be thick enough) to re-create this look. What hazer(s) or act of the divine do cinematographers do to create this? Thanks in advance for the advice!

 

PS - Not sure if it's important but I'm shooting in Central Florida in April so it'll be fairly humid at the time of the shoot.

 

 

post-51596-0-26615400-1389923121.jpg


Edited by Brandon D. Hyde, 18 February 2015 - 03:15 PM.

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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 05:42 PM

It's not a Hazer you need, it's a big, high output, smoke machine. And some favorable atmospheric conditions.


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#3 Brandon D. Hyde

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 05:56 PM

That is definitely helpful Stuart. Can you point me to some of the smoke machines that have that much output? Or any that you favor?

 

Beautiful work, by the way.


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#4 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 07:07 PM

I can't remember specific brand names, but generally you'll need a machine of the type used in venues and clubs, rather than the small 'party foggers' that can be bought for $40-50. For large areas, you may even need a couple of machines.

 

The main issue is getting the smoke to settle. Any wind will ruin your effect, as can temperature changes. I shot a horror movie a few years back that had large night exteriors out in the desert, which the director wanted fogged. As it got dark, the ground started to cool down. The combination of heat rising from the ground and colder air coming in created an updraft which cleared our fog in a matter of seconds, no matter how hard we tried.


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#5 Brandon D. Hyde

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 08:04 PM

Awesome. Thank you very much! I'm hoping it works. I appreciate it.
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#6 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 08:30 PM

Actually, humidity might be your friend here. Having moisture in the air may well help to keep the fog low and stop it dissipating so quickly.


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#7 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 February 2015 - 09:42 PM

You can also do "smoke tubes," basically a long tube, such as this http://www.1stresour...s.com/pipe.html with holes cut into it and capped off at the end running from the fogger. This will help the smoke to cover a larger area, and if you're MOS you can keep the things running during the take; but you will need quite a few for a larger area. 


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#8 Freya Black

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 07:08 AM

You can also do "smoke tubes," basically a long tube, such as this http://www.1stresour...s.com/pipe.html with holes cut into it and capped off at the end running from the fogger. This will help the smoke to cover a larger area, and if you're MOS you can keep the things running during the take; but you will need quite a few for a larger area. 

 

This sounds like a great tip!

Do the holes face downwards? How large should they be?

 

I assume you mean capped off at the far end from the fogger?

 

Freya


Edited by Freya Black, 19 February 2015 - 07:09 AM.

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#9 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 08:37 AM

Used one of these on a feature years ago. Was basically 40' of polythene tube, with a diameter of about 12-15". It was capped at one end, and at the other had a small electric fan. We used the fan to inflate the tube and blow smoke along it. It had pencil sized holes every 3 feet. If you make them too big, the tube won't inflate. Surprisingly effective.


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#10 aapo lettinen

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 11:58 AM

I have intended using this kind of very lightweight plastic tubing for smoke effects but haven't had opportunity to test it yet (this kind of tube seems to be quite hard to find from anywhere if you don't know exactly where it is sold etc.) 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/16-8-6-4-Layflat-polythene-tubing-lay-flat-poly-tube-500-gauge-per-metre-/151560553024?pt=UK_Packaging_Materials&var=&hash=item2349b68240  

 

there is lots of different versions of temporary foldable tubes,

they use this kind of ventilation in construction sites, some outdoor concerts, mining and so on. should be lightweight at least  :)


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#11 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 12:02 PM

If you're using the inflatable ones you holes must be smaller, obviously, but you safe on weight, substantially. If you use the harder tube, which has the problem of transportation, you can do larger holes. Though the holes themselves are generally on the order of 1/4" to 1" depending.


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#12 Brandon D. Hyde

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 04:29 PM

Wow. Awesome guys. EXTREMELY helpful. My director will thank you! As well as I thank you! The tubes idea is one I would not have even thought of. I'll be doing some tests in March and I'll let you all now how it reacts to the humidity and tropical temperatures here in Florida. Again, many thanks!


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