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Chipped Shutter Blade?


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#1 Stewart McLain

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 12:40 PM

I have an old Bolex H16 that I haven't used for about 15 years.  I've been thinking about shooting something with it so I brought it out of the closet to get reacquainted with the controls etc and  I discovered that the edges of the shutter blades have what I think is corrosion due to chipping.  I lightly scraped it with an orange stick and white powder came off.  

I don't think the blades are bent.  The shutter seems to spin smoothly when run.  I kind of think that the blades have been like this the entire time I've owned the camera but maybe the corrosion has worsened a little over time.  It did not affect the film last time I shot with it but if it has worsened I'm afraid that the corrosion would come off into the gate while the film is running.

I guess my question is, is there an easy solution to this?  Like I'm sort of wondering if there is a paint that I could use on the edges of the blades that would seal over the chipped area.  Any advice is appreciated!

 

bolexnasty.jpg


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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 19 February 2015 - 02:25 PM

Intergranular corrosion of the aluminum-magnesium alloy. The paint drops off the blade and the sheeth itself blooms. Better have it replaced by a tech.


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#3 Stewart McLain

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Posted 20 February 2015 - 10:42 AM

Thank you, Simon.


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#4 Simon Wyss

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Posted 21 February 2015 - 07:11 AM

It’s been a pleasure, also because there’s someone who cares for an elder Paillard-Bolex H-16.

I think it’ll be worth to spend an overhaul to the camera after all the years, so the shutter blade thing can go with it.

 

If you state the serial number I can tell the year of manufacture and some technical details.

You can do exact work with the rackover that sells cheaply today.


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#5 Stewart McLain

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 11:46 AM

The serial number is 23081 so I think that makes it a 1966 model.  It's hard not to love a Bolex, even the humble H-16.  They're just beautiful little machines.  


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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 11:49 AM

I'd be tempted just to paint it over with a bit of black enamel.


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#7 Simon Wyss

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 12:22 PM

Stewart, number 23xxx tells the camera was made in 1944 and I would confirm something in that order from the details I see on the picture: The early trifocal viewfinder (the multifocal one came in 1950), the Wollensak 17-2.7 lens. It’s more than 70 years old.

 

You have 190 degrees effective opening angle in the shutter. Exposure time is thus 1/30th second at 16 frames per second or 1/45th second at 24 fps.


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#8 Stewart McLain

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 01:58 PM

That's some good info, Simon.  Thanks!  I pulled that 1966 date off another website…maybe I misunderstood the table they had.  1944 puts it closer to what I originally thought the date might be.  


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#9 Stewart McLain

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Posted 26 February 2015 - 02:03 PM

Mark,  that was my first thought. And I'm still tempted to do it too although now that Simon has identified the date of manufacture as 1944 it doesn't seem like a horrible idea to have it serviced.  It's possible it hasn't been been lubricated since WWII :o   (Although it did work pretty darn flawlessly back around 1998 or so which is a testament to the great build quality of these cameras)


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