Jump to content


Mexican film industry, and how to get into it


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Andrea Altgayer

Andrea Altgayer
  • Guests

Posted 12 May 2005 - 01:00 PM

Hi there guys,

It's Andrea here. I'm quite new on this forum, and hope that you might be able to help me with a few questions that I have about the Mexican film industry,

I am a Mexican who has been living in South Africa for over 10 years. I am working as a film and TV camera operator here. I am deeply passionate about both the South African and Mexican film industry, but I have been out of touch with the industry developments in my home country. I always hear about the actors and actresses, but I want to hear more about the crew, producers, production companies , directors, and most importantly, the trends, issues and concerns amongst filmmakers in the Mexican film industry.

The reason is that Mexican films have earned so much international acclaim over the past few years.I have read that Mexico produces at least 50 feature films annually, which is excellent compared to the 3 South African features that are made every year. Except for a small handful, South African filmmakers have to rely on commercial films (advertisements for film and TV) to earn a living. I think that this is really bizarre, because South Africa and Mexico have so many things in common. For instance, both are new democracies, which have suffered under oppressive governments for over 40 years;both countries suffer from a huge gap between the rich and the poor, with far many more poor people than middle-class or wealthy people; the industries in both counrties are faced with the United States as a serious competitor in terms of film profitablility, because American culture is dominant all over the world. Yet Mexican films seem to be so much more successful in Mexico, than South African films are here. I would love to find out why this is, espefcally considering the number of similarities between the two countries.

1. I would like to find out generally, how Mexicans from all walks of life feel about their film industry. How supportive are they of Mexican films? For example, if an ordinary Mexican goes to the cinema and sees posters for two movies; the first one being a Hollywood blockbuster with well-known actors and directors, and the other being a Mexican film, by a well-known Mexican director, and featuring Mexican actors that are just as well known in our country as the American actors, what are the chances that the Mexican film will be chosen over the American film?

2. What have the government and possibly also the private sector have done to promote the industry? What initiatives have been implemented to promote and develop the industry, especially to increase the profitability of Mexican films amongst Mexican audiences? I would really like to know, because I am a member of a group of independent filmmakers, and I was thinking that maybe the same can be done here to boost the South African industry. One last question about profitability - how popular are Mexican films amongst the rest of Latin America?

3. I also want to find out what the biggest obstacles are that are facing the Mexican film industry, and also what are the obstacles that are faced by new filmmakers about to enter the industry, and how well independent producers and films are received and supported.

4.What are the obstacles faced by young people who are entering and beginning their careers in the industry, especially if they are interested in becoming producers, directors or cinematographers/DOPs?

5.Are there many women entering the more technical aspects of filmmaking, eg working as loaders, focus pullers, sound engineers etc? What is being done to promote them into these positions? If they are keen to enter these fields, instead of the more traditionally "female" positions such as makeup and wardrobe, or production secretary, do they experience any discrimination?

6.Lastly, I would like to know how one should go about entering the film industry there. Over here, it is really difficult to get in unless you have contacts, even if you have studied film. Other than that, you can also register with crewing agencies, who hire film crew on behalf of film production companies. Do they also have crewing agencies in Mexico? How difficult is it to get into the industry, especially if you haven't studied film, and have relatively little experience? How easy or difficult is it to crack it and start working as a runner, or PA, and work your way up?

I am planning to go there next year, firstly to visit my family, and also to find out more about the industry, and start making contacts.

I would welcome any tips that you may have with regards to making inroads into the Mexican film industry. I have a resume with references, and am presently preparing my showreel, but I only have around 18 months' experience in the industry over here, and haven't studied film (although I am strongly considering doing a loader's course next year as I have been working mostly on video, and have not yet worked on feature films). I learnt most of what I know through experience.

I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Yours sincerely,

Andrea Altgayer (Ms.)
  • 0

#2 Sibylle Hayem

Sibylle Hayem

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 13 May 2005 - 02:40 AM

Hello, I just enter this forum and will be very happy to answer you some questions. But , as you touch too many points , I am sorry, I will find the time to answer you propely. I worked in Mexico for 25 years, in and out the industry, in and out independent movies etc... I was the first soundwoman in this country and I opened the space for new generations. I feel that in image, this work has not been done yet... but I don't know really. I am french (and mexican. ). I beleave that the main problem is the crisis in culture , generaly speaking, you know what I mean: NO MONEY ....But young people always overcome that kind of problems with grants from all around .
Well, write to you soon. (I am enjoying the Film Festival in Cannes , right now !)
Sibylle Hayem


Hi there guys,

It's Andrea here. I'm quite new on this forum, and hope that you might be able to help me with a few questions that I have about the Mexican film industry,

I am a Mexican who has been living in South Africa for over 10 years. I am working as a film and TV camera operator here. I am deeply passionate about both the South African and Mexican film industry, but I have been out of touch with the industry developments in my home country. I always hear about the actors and actresses, but I want to hear more about the crew, producers, production companies , directors,  and most importantly, the trends, issues and concerns amongst filmmakers in the Mexican  film industry.

The reason is that Mexican films have earned so much international acclaim over the past few years.I have read that  Mexico produces at least 50 feature films annually, which is excellent compared to the 3 South African features that are made every year. Except for a  small handful, South African filmmakers have to rely on commercial films (advertisements for film and TV) to earn a living. I think that this is really bizarre, because South Africa and Mexico have so many things in common. For instance, both are new democracies, which have suffered under oppressive governments for over 40 years;both countries suffer from a huge gap between the rich and the poor, with far many more poor people than middle-class or wealthy people; the industries in both counrties are faced with the United States as a serious competitor in terms of film profitablility, because American culture is dominant all over the world.  Yet Mexican films seem to be  so much more successful in Mexico, than South African films are here. I would love to find out why this is, espefcally considering the number of similarities between the two countries.

1. I would like to find out generally, how Mexicans from all walks of life feel about their film industry. How supportive are they of Mexican films?  For example, if an ordinary Mexican goes to the cinema and sees posters for two movies; the first one being a Hollywood blockbuster with well-known actors and directors, and the other being a Mexican film, by a well-known Mexican director, and featuring  Mexican actors that are just as well known in our country as the American actors, what are the chances that the Mexican film will be chosen over the American film?

2. What  have the government and possibly also the private sector have done to promote the industry?  What initiatives have been implemented to promote and develop the industry, especially to increase the profitability of Mexican films amongst Mexican audiences? I would really like to know, because I am a member of a group of independent filmmakers, and I was thinking that  maybe the same can be done here to boost the South African industry. One last question about profitability  - how popular are Mexican films amongst the rest of Latin America?

3. I also want to find out what the biggest obstacles are that are facing the Mexican film industry, and also what are the obstacles that are faced by new filmmakers about to enter the industry, and how well independent producers and films are received and supported.

4.What are the obstacles faced by young people who are entering and beginning their careers in  the industry, especially if they are interested in becoming producers, directors or cinematographers/DOPs?

5.Are there many women entering the more technical aspects of filmmaking, eg working as loaders, focus pullers, sound engineers etc? What is being done to promote them into these positions? If they are keen to enter these fields, instead of the more traditionally "female" positions such as makeup and wardrobe, or production secretary, do they experience any discrimination?

6.Lastly, I would like to know how one should go about entering the film industry there. Over here, it is really difficult to get in unless you have contacts, even if you have studied film. Other than that, you can also register with crewing agencies, who hire film crew on behalf of film  production companies. Do they also have crewing agencies in Mexico? How difficult is it to get into the industry, especially if you haven't studied film, and have relatively little experience? How easy or difficult is it to crack it and start working as a runner, or PA, and work your way up?

I am planning to go there next year, firstly to visit my family, and also to find out more about the industry, and start making contacts.

I would welcome any tips that you may have with regards to making inroads into the Mexican film industry. I have a resume with references, and am presently preparing my showreel, but I only have around 18 months' experience in the industry over here, and haven't studied film (although I am strongly considering doing a loader's course next year as I have been working mostly on video, and have not yet worked on feature films). I learnt most of what I know through experience.

I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Yours sincerely,

Andrea Altgayer (Ms.)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  • 0

#3 Andrea Altgayer

Andrea Altgayer
  • Guests

Posted 13 May 2005 - 01:09 PM

Hola Sybille!

I am so glad to hear from someone who has been working in the Mexican film industry!

I am really looking forward to your responses to the many questions that I asked in my first post, and would also love to hear about your experiences in the Mexican film industry: how you got in, and what it was like for you working there as a woman in the sound department!

I would welcome any advice that you may have, and am looking forward to hearing from you soon. Thanks in advance for your help.

Regards,

Andrea
  • 0

#4 Sibylle Hayem

Sibylle Hayem

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 18 May 2005 - 12:09 PM

Hola Andrea, sorry it takes me a lng time to answer, but I am really busy and trying to enjoy the Festival in Cannes !

You are putting together too many things that don't mix (I guess !)
1) Mexico has a totaly other politic structure than South Africa. It had a party at the power for 70 years, in 2000 there was an oposition (right wing) that dismissed that party (The PRI) and now that the PAN has won, every thing is worse. A little bit like in France every body had to vote for Chirac instead of the fachiste Le Pen.... This new gobernment opened the country to the free market, the president had only the experience of being the director for Cocacola and is quite proud saying that he has no time to read a book !
So, it is a poor country, always has been but with a brilliant culture that tries to survive , even with the USA so close. It has a very big influence in all Latin America, because this strong culture. The former gobernment was issued of the Mexican revolution and at it start they had hudge projects. For instance the film industry. As an industry. That made more money than petrol.They could produce 185 films a year.But that was because USA was on war.... And Hollywood was not working. It was a time when there was a special crew that came together: Very big stars like Maria Felix, Pedro Almendariz, Dolores del Rio , Pedro Infante , then such a big photographer like Gabriel Figueroa, incredible directors . So to remain together, they created an UNION , nobody could enter the film industry and that was it. This period last until 1976. I startd working in short film department even if we were making long features: no way for me , as a stranger (I am french and mexican) for a sound women to even get closed to that.
Well, that'is the end of the first part of a very long story, I hope I am not boring you....
See you, Sibylle

Hola Sybille!

I am so glad to hear from someone who has been working in the Mexican film industry!

I am really looking forward to your responses to the many questions that I asked in my first post, and would also love to hear about your experiences in the Mexican film industry: how you got in, and what it was like for you working there as a woman in the sound department!

I would welcome any advice that you may have, and am looking forward to hearing from you soon. Thanks in advance for your help.

Regards,

Andrea

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  • 0

#5 Sibylle Hayem

Sibylle Hayem

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 18 May 2005 - 12:10 PM

Hola Andrea, sorry it takes me a lng time to answer, but I am really busy and trying to enjoy the Festival in Cannes !

You are putting together too many things that don't mix (I guess !)
1) Mexico has a totaly other politic structure than South Africa. It had a party at the power for 70 years, in 2000 there was an oposition (right wing) that dismissed that party (The PRI) and now that the PAN has won, every thing is worse. A little bit like in France every body had to vote for Chirac instead of the fachiste Le Pen.... This new gobernment opened the country to the free market, the president had only the experience of being the director for Cocacola and is quite proud saying that he has no time to read a book !
So, it is a poor country, always has been but with a brilliant culture that tries to survive , even with the USA so close. It has a very big influence in all Latin America, because this strong culture. The former gobernment was issued of the Mexican revolution and at it start they had hudge projects. For instance the film industry. As an industry. That made more money than petrol.They could produce 185 films a year.But that was because USA was on war.... And Hollywood was not working. It was a time when there was a special crew that came together: Very big stars like Maria Felix, Pedro Almendariz, Dolores del Rio , Pedro Infante , then such a big photographer like Gabriel Figueroa, incredible directors . So to remain together, they created an UNION , nobody could enter the film industry and that was it. This period last until 1976. I startd working in short film department even if we were making long features: no way for me , as a stranger (I am french and mexican) for a sound women to even get closed to that.
Well, that'is the end of the first part of a very long story, I hope I am not boring you....
See you, Sibylle

Hola Sybille!

I am so glad to hear from someone who has been working in the Mexican film industry!

I am really looking forward to your responses to the many questions that I asked in my first post, and would also love to hear about your experiences in the Mexican film industry: how you got in, and what it was like for you working there as a woman in the sound department!

I would welcome any advice that you may have, and am looking forward to hearing from you soon. Thanks in advance for your help.

Regards,

Andrea

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  • 0

#6 Laurent Andrieux

Laurent Andrieux
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1527 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • France

Posted 19 May 2005 - 06:07 PM

Hi Sibylle, welcome to these forums. I'm glad you made your way to here ! You can delete your double posting if you want ! ;)

Please, be keeping posting about the film industry history in Mexico ! It sounds really interesing !
  • 0

#7 MiguelDelValle

MiguelDelValle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Mexico City

Posted 25 May 2005 - 03:17 AM

Hey Andrea

How interesting your time in South Africa, I am a mexican who had a close relation with another african country in the past and have been involved in film for 14 years now.

Your questions and concerns are normal and I can help you with some opinions although most of them are not as optimistic as they should about the generals of the industry, there are good things of course and we all try to survive to a non existent industry.

You have seen some films out there with succes but industry is a difficult word to translate in therms of film buisness, there is an industry in USA and there is one in India but in México I dont think we can call it like that.

The days where, as sybylle said, in the black and white era films, the golden era of the mexican movies were 40s and 50s. I dont know if the reason was the US at war, there were a lot of cinemas around latinamerica showing mexican pictures, marathon screenings in places like cuba or venezuela with 3 or 4 movies with only one ticket at the theaters, big stars and faces still in the collective memory, like dolres del rio, ask orson wells about her :-) technical perfection.

And many stories like Greg Tolland,s close friend Gabriel Figueroa who culdnt work in hollywood because of Mcarthy´s rules. But, hey, John Ford came here to shoot with him.

Lots of big names tarkovsky, buñuel, just to name a few.





cheers

Edited by MiguelDelValle, 25 May 2005 - 03:18 AM.

  • 0

#8 Sibylle Hayem

Sibylle Hayem

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 25 May 2005 - 03:26 AM

Hello Miguel, I saw you a couple of time in this forum. I feel we are going to end up this discution the 2 of us ! Que no es problema !
What do you do in Mexico ? you have actually enought work as a cameraman ? or you are in publicity ?
Most of my friends (directors) are trying to rise budgets in Europe...Because the situation in Mexico is a disaster, one more time.
Funny that we have no more news from Andrea but I just saw she made a hudge posting with the same questions about american industry...in an other forum.
Hope to read you. Sibylle
  • 0

#9 MiguelDelValle

MiguelDelValle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Mexico City

Posted 25 May 2005 - 01:48 PM

jajaja, yes.

I edited my post, It was said: "I think that anyone here will be interested on this topic, but write to me direct and I will answer all your questions trying not to be to pesimistc" but then Laurent Andrieux wrote that he is interested so we can keep talking about it and in english if there is any use and if you like, Laurent.

Ive been a memember of this forum since maybe 5 years ago but I tend to have long internet vacations form time to time.

Yes I am a DoP and when the dark side beats me I produce some things, runned away from editing that I did for several years and after a terrible year (2004) this one cought me with a few commercials, wich I received well because I have a few bills to pay. :-)

Although I ve heard that this year the feature production was going to rise and I know of a few movies that are shooting right know (with the bad luck that i am not working on one of those), Mexico IS a disaster again, but we all knew it was going to be like that, president fox on his first month as president back in 2000 said about movies and film that the last movie he saw was a western, 30 years ago.

Than came the idea of selling studios churubusco to private investors. Can you imagine that?, not that I deffend the actual state of churubusco (for the ones who doesnt know and are interested, this studios were the most important in the golden era, it was a like mexican universal studios; right know they survive renting soundstages, lab, sound facilities and renting production offices, they are owned by the government, and keep alive for the pride of lost times).

It is a trip to go there, all the buildings from the 40s and all those ghosts, old equipment, I like it.

But there was this mennace to convert the place in a big shopping mall, since president fox was thinking that churubusco was only eating budget without any real use, and although he doesnt care about film industry he was right, SO all the beurocrats started moving some money to keep that alive...

and there I was as a coordinator of post production for an IMCINE (goverment film offcie) movie. The money as always went for the usual directors who had been benefited for them for years an never got a good selling movie and we were in plane 2001 editing on a moviola, proyected film rushes on the lab screening room, we had to dig into the trash of the studios to find 35mm sound film that didnt break when we pulled it trough the proyector wich was an old russian model.

It was a mess, but that was just a sign of the times to come.

The procces of that movie was beautiful it was refreshing for me to forget about avids and cut lists and did everything like they did in the 40s. At the end, the movie was so bad that they couldn even screen the picture anywere, there was no sense of continuity, the editor couldnt edit the movie on some places, terrible, and I am talking about someone who had been directing for many many years, at least 25 government produced movies.

This is just another tiny story about our "industry".

Why we are talking only of governement sources?, because the private sector is another long story.

Enough for today I hope this is not boring as anything.

Edited by MiguelDelValle, 25 May 2005 - 01:54 PM.

  • 0

#10 Andrea Altgayer

Andrea Altgayer
  • Guests

Posted 25 May 2005 - 06:55 PM

Hola Miguel and Sybille,

Thanks so much for your responses. They were reall helpful and enlightening. In fact, there are no words to express exactly how much you both opened my eyes.
Thanks!

I will get back to you both as soon as I have a moment.

Bye,

Andrea
  • 0

#11 Sibylle Hayem

Sibylle Hayem

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 26 May 2005 - 07:03 AM

Hello Miguel.
I worked in Churubusco for so many years !(since 1978 in Corto Metraje !!!)
But I have a terrible experience: in 1997 I raised a Phonothèque, I rescued 15oo movies , with all that old 35 mm magnetic machines etc..; you see what I mean , 17,5 mm actually. I was all by myself, I had no support from the movie directors, from IMCINE , just I became very friend with the composers. The studios Churubusco would give me a salary but no computer ! Finally , in 2002 I ran away .That's why I am in France, giving classes and I met Laurent andrieux . We work together.
These Fox years are worst than every thing knowned before ...I don't want to be pessimitic but I don't belive in a new wave of productions.
Hope to hear from you soon.
Sibylle
  • 0

#12 MiguelDelValle

MiguelDelValle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Mexico City

Posted 29 May 2005 - 03:14 PM

Wow, so you know everything about what I said.

And you had been so close to many shorts movies around, is there anything that you liked from all that time???

I agree, I dont think the "new" wave is going to arise anything soon.

Beurocrats needed a hero to defend from themselves from mediocrity and found pretty easy to pick one guy from the bunch an give him something like 8 arieles for a movie shot a few years ago.

This guy may have talent, He has it, but the system is something that cant be trusted, they are so obvius, he was a student for the "academy guys" who else could be supported!!!!

Lately someone asked me about private ways to produce and I have been thinking about it, many questions few answers but the system is working against producers, just there is no way to have return on a movie.

Producing is only a labor of love, I dont know but I think amores perros did some money after they hit the external markets and maybe on video distribution. If I knew that the movie did some money on mexican theatre screenings I would be amazed.

cheers
  • 0

#13 Sibylle Hayem

Sibylle Hayem

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Sound Department

Posted 30 May 2005 - 02:23 PM

Hello ! I remember the good old time I had made the sound for the 3 films on turn for the Ariel, so I was sure to win !!!
The shame is that an Ariel means nothing, as you say, a price just between old pals.
The good time of short movie: Mexico was so rich because of the OIL, that we should shoot everything in 35 mm, with this beautiful Arri 35 BL.
I remember ways of producing outside the UNION, but you must assure an external market. See how Reygadas had to fight for "Japan" and he just made "Batallas en el cielo" out from IMCINE . I imagine they were mad after him , that movie was on the official selection in Cannes and the people of IMCINE in the film's market did not even go and see it. I think it is outrageous.(I work in Cannes).
The problem in Mexico is that the distributor gets all the benifits, you know that better than I do....and there is no good screen writers;
Our virtual friend Andrea is now surching in Bollywood.
Cheers.
Sibylle




Wow, so you know everything about what I said.

And you had been so close to many shorts movies around, is there anything that you liked from all that time???

I agree, I dont think the "new" wave is going to arise anything soon.

Beurocrats needed a hero to defend from themselves from mediocrity and found pretty easy to pick one guy from the bunch an give him something like 8 arieles for a movie shot a few years ago.

This guy may have talent, He has it, but the system is something that cant be trusted, they are so obvius, he was a student for the "academy guys" who else could be supported!!!!

Lately someone asked me about private ways to produce and I have been thinking about it, many questions few answers but the system is working against producers, just there is no way to have return on a movie.

Producing is only a labor of love, I dont know but I think amores perros did some money after they hit the external markets and maybe on video distribution. If I knew that the movie did some money on mexican theatre screenings I would be amazed.

cheers

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


  • 0

#14 oscar jimenez

oscar jimenez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Posted 31 May 2005 - 08:27 AM

Hola Miguel, estuve viendo el site de tu compania y el trabajo se ve muy interesante, cuentame a parte de director de fotografia tambien eres productor?
Tengo un amigo de NY que lo mas probable este rodando un feature film en Mexico proximamente y le comente acerca de la compania que sale listada bajo tu firma, dime si estarias interesado en la posibilidad de producir esto, no se si ya tienen todo montado pero siempre hay el chance de establecer una relacion para una proxima ocasion y recomendaciones.
Gracias
Oscar
  • 0

#15 oscar jimenez

oscar jimenez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Posted 01 June 2005 - 08:16 AM

HOla Miguel, es oscared58@hotmail.com
  • 0

#16 Laurent Andrieux

Laurent Andrieux
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1527 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • France

Posted 01 June 2005 - 03:12 PM

Sorry, guys, but this is an international-english-speaking forum, and anybody can be interested ! so please post in english and use PMs and mails for personnal conversations ! :)
  • 0

#17 oscar jimenez

oscar jimenez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 317 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • PANAMA, REPUBLIC OF PANAMA

Posted 01 June 2005 - 08:10 PM

my apologies, didn't mean to offend. Sure doesn't look polite, by the way, what does PM stands for? new term in my defficient english.
  • 0

#18 Alvin Pingol

Alvin Pingol
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 677 posts
  • Student
  • California

Posted 03 June 2005 - 12:18 AM

what does PM stands for?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Private Message; the option to send one can be found to the left of a user's post, below his or her avatar and info. A useful feature for privately communicating with other board members, without having to use e-mail.
  • 0

#19 Felipe Perez-Burchard

Felipe Perez-Burchard
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 130 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles, CA USA / Mexico D.F., Mexico

Posted 03 June 2005 - 02:28 AM

Andrea,

Thank you for starting this post...

Sybille and Miguel,

thanks for your advice.

I am also from Mexico, but I studied in the US and right now I am working on what they call OPT which means that I have a year within my student visa to work without any hassle.
So far I've been mostly a camera PA, a few times a loader and I've also worked a bit in electric departments all the while trying to shoot whatever I can (I aspire to be a DP).
I've been learning a great deal in the last couple of months and have been making good contacts.

But without a company to sponsor me (meaning I have to be working for salary, something that doesn't really happen in this industry) after the year is up I might have to go back to mexico.

but I fear that since I've been away from home for 4 years, I won't know how to get my foot in the door. I'm sure it's about contacts there as well.

you say it is in pretty bad shape, and I do remember hearing about what's been going on with fox.
there was a little while there before I left for college; 97, 98 maybe, when they started to push for more mexican films to be shown and produced, there were ballots and everything, it was exiting, and a surge of movies started to come out but then I heard that I think in 01 all the money they were putting on movies was cancelled... of course it is true that they didn't have money for it, but still a shame.

but if I go back , do you have any advice for breaking in?

An AC I've worked with is also from South Africa and has told me about how the industry works there, like Andrea said, there are agencies that represent ACs, PAs even, because there is a lot of international productions that go down there and hire crews.

Can you tell me a little about how the UNION works back home...
I'm a little ashamed to not know how certain aspects of my home's industry work; when I was in high school I was too naive to think about the professional practices of the field and just made movies for fun and creative outlet.

Also it seems like once some one makes it big, they eventually land in the States... Lubezki, Prieto, and Navarro, Perez-Grobet are all really talented mexican cinematographers, but they all live in the US now. How did they get started?
is there a strict going up thru the ranks in the departments like in the US?
I know in South africa for example, you definitely have to go thru the ranks, but for example there usually is never a loader, that is the 2nd ac job, is production run with smaller crews like that in mexico?

Thank you very much for reading and for you opinions and advice.

-felipe.
  • 0

#20 MiguelDelValle

MiguelDelValle
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Mexico City

Posted 06 June 2005 - 02:27 AM

Sorry, guys, but this is an international-english-speaking forum, and anybody can be interested ! so please post in english and use PMs and mails for personnal conversations !  :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I am sorry it was just a "contact to me offline answer"

Edited by MiguelDelValle, 06 June 2005 - 02:28 AM.

  • 0


Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

Opal

Glidecam

CineTape

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Metropolis Post