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Would you live here?


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#1 scott karos

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 10:11 AM

 

 

I had never shot anything in black and white before so this was basically me just trying it out. This is the rest of my channel: 

 

https://www.youtube....8Ii8Imsi-xetfaw


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#2 John E Clark

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 12:43 PM

I'd suggest getting some old issues of "Architectural Digest" to see how various interiors are lit. I think I could live with the blown out windows, if there was interior detail in the shadow areas.


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#3 Mark Dunn

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 12:51 PM

Yes, not a lot to see for a lot of it.


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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 03:42 PM

You should also watch some older films that were shot on black & white to get a sense of tonal control.  Here are a few films to look at: 

 

Casablanca (1942)

White Heat (1949)

From Here to Eternity (1953)

On the Waterfront (1954)

Paths of Glory (1957)

The Seventh Seal (1957)

The Hustler (1961)

Days of Wine & Roses (1962)

To Kill A Mockingbird (1962)

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)


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#5 scott karos

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 06:23 PM

Are most black and white films of today mostly made in post production when they do the color correction? It seems that they rarely shoot the film in b and w on set.
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#6 John E Clark

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 06:39 PM

Are most black and white films of today mostly made in post production when they do the color correction? It seems that they rarely shoot the film in b and w on set.

 

I don't have the time to research this exhaustively, but "Ida"(2014) which just won the Best Foreign Film category at the Oscars, was shot on an Alexa, and converted to B&W. I think, I've read, that ARRI is coming out with a 'monochrome' camera.

 

"The Artist"(2011) winning Best Picture at the Oscars, was shot according to IMDB on Kodak Vision 3 500T, and so would have been converted as well. (And in addition to B&W... was a 'Silent' film...).

 

I'm sure there have been many Real™ B&W films made even now, but in terms of standard Hollywood Major Motion Pictures, it does not look like actual B&W is used.

 

The B&W category for the Oscars lasted until the mid-60s as a separate category.

 

In terms of my own experience, the Wife and I shot Real™ B&W and Color still film for wedding coverage until we switched over to completely digital DSLR coverage. We then used Photoshop to convert to B&W as required.


Edited by John E Clark, 04 March 2015 - 06:42 PM.

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#7 Tyler Purcell

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 01:48 AM

Plus X, Tri X, Vision 500 made B&W in post… I put it all in one film! :) 

 


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