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ARRI Master Anamorphic Flare Sets


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#1 Tim Tyler

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 12:19 PM

The new ARRI Master Anamorphic Flare Sets are highly

versatile and economical accessories for the ARRI/ZEISS Master Anamorphic lens

series. Each of the seven Master Anamorphic focal lengths has its own specific flare set,

comprising easily replaceable front and rear glass elements that can be used individually

or in combination to provide the lens with three additional looks for enriched on-set

Since their introduction in 2013, the Master Anamorphic lenses have established

themselves as the most advanced anamorphic optics ever designed for the film and

television industry. Offering a perfect combination of compact form factor, minimal

weight, distortion-free optical performance and an unparalleled high speed of T1.9

across the entire focal length range, they are as fast and easy to use as spherical cine

lenses and represent a major step forward in anamorphic cinematography.

 

2015 03-04 MA 50 with Lens Flare Set.jpg

 

For most shooting situations, cinematographers and also VFX supervisors appreciate

how effectively the Master Anamorphic optical design and coating technology suppress

flares and reflections. Under certain circumstances, however, flares might be exactly

what a cinematographer wants in order to heighten the emotional impact of a shot,

sequence or project by introducing a level of technical ‘imperfection.’ It is for these

situations that the Master Anamorphic Flare Sets have been designed.

 

The front and rear glass elements that come with each flare set have a special lens

coating that encourages flaring, ghosting and veiling glare. These image effects create a

visual style that is consistent across all of the flare sets and can be controlled or tweaked

via the iris setting, as well as the positioning of lighting fixtures. The front element can be

used on its own, as can the rear, or they can be used in combination; each permutation

provides a distinct look without sacrificing the resolution, lack of distortion or corner-to-
corner optical performance for which the Master Anamorphics are famous.

 

Master Anamorphic Flare Sets

 

By using the new ARRI Master Anamorphic Toolkit (purchased separately but

compatible with all seven flare sets), the front and rear glass elements can be

exchanged with the regular Master Anamorphic elements in a matter of minutes, since

each flare element is pre-aligned in a metal frame. Whether for a feature film, TV show,

music video or commercial, the Master Anamorphic Flare Sets give rental facilities a

quick and cost-effective way of offering anamorphic productions greater on-set creativity.

A set of Master Anamorphics effectively becomes four different sets, each suitable for

different flaring requirements while maintaining the huge advantage of being freer from

distortions such as curved horizons, focus breathing and ‘mumps’ and ‘pincushion’

effects than any other anamorphic lenses on the market.


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#2 Albion Hockney

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 04:24 PM

It might be a long while before I can afford to bring those to set, but really interesting.

 

Seems to me though if you want flares/ghosting you probably also don't mind some resolution loss and other problems. Be interesting to see how these compare to just using Lomos or something.


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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 05:28 PM

Wanting flares and ghosting doesn't mean you also want edge softness and anamorphic mumps. These lenses will outperform Lomos by a huge margin.


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#4 Albion Hockney

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 11:38 PM

It feels kinda cheesy to me though, new technology replicating old lens problems. Or maybe its a new modern asthetic.


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#5 Albion Hockney

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 02:48 PM

Video:

 

Mixed feelings about it.


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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 02:52 PM

Pretty. I like.


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#7 Kar Wai Ng

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 04:56 PM

I thought perhaps these would look cheesy as well, but I really do like what the Flare Sets are doing to the image. I'd be interested to know/see more about the effect of using only the front or rear flare elements vs together.


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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 02:10 AM

Meh. The Master Anamorphics were designed to be modern looking - contrasty and highly corrected. Just removing some coatings feels like an afterthought, like adding salt on top of a finished cake to make it less sweet.

Personally, I don't much like flares on modern high contrast lenses, the trade-off of more global contrast for harder-edged, more-defined flares makes them feel more obviously two-dimensional and thus artificial. I prefer when lens flares and other lens artifacts blend with the image in a more seamless way, creating the illusion of a surreal scene in front of the lens, instead of being created entirely by the lens. Lower contrast helps hide the seams.
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#9 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 03:08 AM

I'm kinda Meh on that video honestly; though in truth it may just be they aren't really showing it well. Truth be told, though in a pragmatic way, it's a brilliant idea. It just remains to be seen if they can produce a lense with more personality than a german waiting room-- I personally feel all the new-er zeiss glass, while wonderful in a technical way, is lacking in emotive power. I wish i could explain that better, but I can't. Maybe I'm just too in love with the Cooke Look.


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#10 Albion Hockney

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 12:10 PM

Yep, feels too artifical is my feeling. I think the right project it could work and the idea that flares arn't just a deffect to embrace but literally another tool is a new way of looking at things if that makes sense.


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#11 John Miguel King

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 02:44 AM

Magnificent glass with or without the flare elements. I worked with the standard version a couple of weeks ago. They come straight from awesomeness-Valhalla.


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