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#1 Nate Downes

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Posted 13 May 2005 - 10:10 PM

I may have an option to produce a movie in Canada next year. As I've never had to deal with cross-state productions before, not even considering cross-country productions, what would I have to secure on my part before even imvolving myself in this?
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 12:32 AM

So you'd be coming here as the producer? And hiring a Canadian crew?

Of course the fastest way is to just say you're in Canada to visit friends. Americans don't need a VISA to enter Canada and you can stay for six months with no paper work of any kind. Or say you're coming in as a tourist.

If you think US immigration is a nightmare just wait until you encounter the Canadian system.

Honestly, I can give you dozens of examples where hard working honest people are refused entry or deported while criminals get first class treatment. Why? Because the criminals have money to buy as many lawyers as they need to fight the system.

Get this, in Vancouver right now legions of "refugee claimants" from Ecudaor are selling drugs on the streets. The police can't touch them and the gov't can't deport them because EVERY case has to be heard before a judge and this takes months or years. It's been on all the news here, and these guys just laugh at the stupid Canadian immigration system.

If you're coming to Canada for a shoot that will last a few weeks trying to get a work permit will drive you around the bend, especially since you're American. You can't claim you're from an oppressed place.

If you where from a dirt poor third world country Canada would welcome you with open arms. But a well educated prosperous American? You'll be shown the door.

Here's the official web site of the Canadian immigration dept.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/

R.
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#3 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 03:39 AM

Of course the fastest way is to just say you're in Canada to visit friends.  Americans don't need a VISA to enter Canada and you can stay for six months with no paper work of any kind.  Or say you're coming in as a tourist.

R.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Not for long. Passports will be required to go to Canada very soon.
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#4 Richard Boddington

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 12:28 PM

Yes, you may need a passport. But you don't need a VISA, there is a difference.

All you would have to do is show your US passport at the airport and you can stay in Canada for six months with no paper work required. Same for Canadians going into the USA.

R.
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#5 Frank Barrera

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 07:50 AM

I also may be shooting a feature in Vancouver this fall. What's the general rule in terms of who can and can't come up to work? Producers, Directors, DPs, below the line positions? As a DP what if anything do I have to do to work in Canada? Can I bring an AC?

Our producers of course will look into all of this. But not for a while. So I just was wondering... How does it work? As well, is there a centralize resource for finding crew?

Thanks for your time,

Frank Barrera
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#6 Richard Boddington

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 10:19 AM

Check that link I posted to the Canadian Immigration site for the final answers.

All I can tell you is that some people I know at a US film production company are in Ontario right now shooting a feature for five weeks. They had an absolute nightmare of a time getting work permits for their people to work in Canada. This included a wide variety of crew positions.

The key will be to start early, as the process will surely take a long time.

Vancouver is of course full of ACs, so it may simply be easier to hire a local guy.

Big name stars from the US and famous directors are let in pretty easily, crew not so easy, the Canadian gov't wants to see that work go to locals.

Remember Canada is more screwed up than the USA in every regard. So don't expect USA levels of efficiency.

Too bad you're shooting in Vancouver if you where shooting in Quebec the gov't would roll out the red carpet for you and do every thing you ask in short order. Quebec is the spoiled brat of Canada and they get every thing they want in double quick time.

R.
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 11:04 AM

Kodak's Canadian sales offices in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver are familiar with the local production environment, and often can provide referrals for local support:

http://www.kodak.com....5&lc=en#canada

CANADA
Kodak Canada Inc.
3500 Eglinton Avenue West
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M6M 1V3
Phone: 1-416-761-4922
Orders: 1-800-621-FILM (3456)
Fax: 1-416-761-4948
Toll Free Fax: 866-211-6311

Kodak Canada Inc.
4 Place du Commerce, Suite 100
Ile des Soeurs
Verdun, Quebec
Canada H3E 1J4
Orders: 1-800-621-FILM (3456)
Fax: 1-866-211-6311

Kodak Canada Inc.
4185 Still Creek Drive
Suite C150
Burnaby, British Columbia
Canada V5C 6G9
Orders: 1-800-621-FILM (3456)
Fax: 1-866-211-6311
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#8 Nate Downes

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Posted 16 May 2005 - 10:04 PM

Thanks everyone. And yes, I'd be a producer if this were to happen. I'd be using an entirely canadian crew, I'd be the only American on-set if it falls into place. So, probably easier than to try and get a ton of Americans into the country. The option is quite interesting, so I'm exploring my options now.

Edited by downix, 16 May 2005 - 10:06 PM.

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#9 Richard Boddington

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 10:12 AM

One thing you will definately want to keep an eye on downix is the Canadian dollar.

It's fallen well back of it's seven month high of .84 USD now it's trading around the .78 USD mark. This means that one USD buys $1.27 CDN today, which is a big improvement for you over the $1.20 a USD was buying. ( an no you don't just subtract .78 from 1.00 to arrive at the exchange rate, it's much more complicated than that)

Of course no where near as good as the $1.50 CDN you would have got two years ago, which started the stampede of run away productions to Canada, and the subsequent protests in LA.

This will mean of course that if you have a million dollar USD budget you'll get 1.27 million just for crossing the border.

There will most likely be an election soon in Canada, we'll know on Thursday, and this will help to keep downward pressure on the Canadian dollar. Also the USD is finally gaining some ground against the Euro and the Yen, and this is helping to push down the Canadian dollar.

Six months from now you might get $1.30 - $1.40 CDN for your USD, then again you might only get $1.20 if the Canadian buck shoots back up again.

You can track it here....

http://www.bankofcan...a/en/index.html

R.
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#10 Benjamin_Lussier

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 07:40 PM

"Quebec is the spoiled brat of Canada and they get every thing they want in double quick time."

Richard...
Would you PLEASE stop bashing Quebec for no reason, no one asked you to.
Its MORE than a recurent pattern!
Every time you mention Canada, you have to put down Quebec and Montreal...
Just leave it ! There's THOUSANDS of forums on the Net where you can do that!

"If you where from a dirt poor third world country Canada would welcome you with open arms. But a well educated prosperous American? You'll be shown the door."

What's wrong with that?
Immigrant A: NEEDS to move to Canada because he's being repressed by his government.
Immigrant B: Could very well live in his home country and be quite happy.

Who are you going to let in? I dont know about you but I'd choose A. The idea that immigrant A is AUTOMATICALLY a criminal is a false one.

downix

First,
You need a letter of introduction signed by an official representative of the production company or the Production Manager... You send that letter to the HRDC
(Human Resources Development Canada )

Once you do that, the workers (key-staff) can apply for a work permit at the border.

"U.S. citizens and permanent residents of the U.S. can apply directly at the point of entry in Canada (at the Canada/U.S. border CIC office or atan international airport's CIC office."

150$ CAN per application form

Thats ONLY for americans though....

CHeerios

Ben
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#11 Richard Boddington

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 09:19 PM

"Who are you going to let in? I dont know about you but I'd choose A. The idea that immigrant A is AUTOMATICALLY a criminal is a false one. "

Benny_the_kid,

You're freaking nuts!!

R,
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#12 Benjamin_Lussier

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 09:23 PM

Yeah... sure Richard...
Whatever makes you feel good ;)
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#13 Richard Boddington

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 10:06 PM

It does actually, thank-you.

R,
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#14 Robert Edge

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 03:00 PM

Thanks everyone.  And yes, I'd be a producer if this were to happen.  I'd be using an entirely canadian crew, I'd be the only American on-set if it falls into place.  So, probably easier than to try and get a ton of Americans into the country. The option is quite interesting, so I'm exploring my options now.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


You won't have any trouble getting authorisation to work in Canada. I assume you know that the federal Government and the various provincial governments offer tax incentives relating to film production. If not, you should find out about the rules. There's a pretty good article by a US lawyer about how it works in the magazine Filmmaker, two or three issues back. You should also have a look at this website: www.telefilm.gc.ca

Richard,

Are you aware of the fact that one of the reasons that Days of Heaven was made in Canada was that Nestor Almendros could get permission to work in Canada, but could not get permission to work in the US? Just curious :)
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#15 Richard Boddington

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Posted 25 May 2005 - 04:52 PM

"Are you aware of the fact that one of the reasons that Days of Heaven was made in Canada was that Nestor Almendros could get permission to work in Canada, but could not get permission to work in the US? Just curious"

No I wasn't aware of that.

But it has become painfully clear that the Canadian gov't will let in virtually any one, except decent hard working educated people.

Why is it that my friend who came to Canada from Australia had to wait nine months before he could work here? He's smart and well educated.

Contrast this with "refugee claimants" from the third world who are able to work and collect welfare the instant they leave the airport. They are also instantly covered by provincial health insurance. If I move to BC I have to wait six months before I can be covered by the provincial health plan, and I'm a freaking Canadian citizen!! This is a fact, it can not be disputed.

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#16 Benjamin_Lussier

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 11:28 AM

"Contrast this with "refugee claimants" from the third world who are able to work and collect welfare the instant they leave the airport.They are also instantly covered by provincial health insurance. "

Thats not a fact, check the immigration policies.
http://www.cic.gc.ca...rate/index.html

And the thought that refugee claimants hurt the country and the economy is such a baseless statement. You see this in your society because you're looking for it! It's called xenophobia, Richard. From what Ive read in your posts, you like immigrants ... when they're just like you. You don"t respect the difference. You don't think that other languages and other cultures can bring something to your society.



I know you'll reply... and argue again and again.... Just accept it... You're not open-minded! It's so obvious. There's so much scorn, hatred and prejudice in your heart. Its just sad. And if respecting multiculturalism and refugge claimants makes me nuts,
then I'm glad to be a nut case.

Ben
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#17 Richard Boddington

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 11:48 AM

Well I'm an immigrant from the UK.

But....do I demand that Canada be like the UK?

Do I expect my queen to be on Canadian money?

Do I expect the provincial flags of Ontario, Manitoba, and BC to include the Union Jack?

Do I expect new immigrants to swear loyalty to the queen instead of Canada?

Do I expect there to be a governor general to represent my queen in Canada?

Do I expect....oh wait, never mind.

R,
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#18 Benjamin_Lussier

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 02:19 PM

If your definition of multiculturalism is the difference between Canada and the UK, I've made my point.

Ben
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#19 Richard Boddington

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 02:22 PM

The UK is plenty distinct from Canada.

Do we have flake bars here? Mushy peas?

I rest my case.

R,
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#20 Benjamin_Lussier

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 08:05 PM

You rest your case all you want... that doesnt make you right...

I lived in britain for 7 years... and I'm sorry.... but the cultures are similar in MANY aspects.... Its an occidental society! Which means Canada's values and customs weren't that shocking to you at all. And besides, we're talking about refugees! 93% of Refugees are from non-occidental countries, which means their first language is not english, and they have a very different culture.

I call you xenophobic and you answer: Im not... cuz Im from the UK and I adapted to Canada's lifestyle. I mean... Come on... even you must admit its silly!

It's like saying.. Im open-minded and I embrace all cultures cuz I like both Americans and Canadians.... It would be funny if I didnt feel so sorry for you. Man... honestly... Do something, go back to school.... travel to south africa.. I dunno... How can you live like this? You're so bitter and stubborn.... and from what Ive read on this forum Im not the only one to think so...

U can reply to this all you want, Im not answering... Its just hopeless
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