Jump to content


Quality Without Lighting on 16mm


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 FilmmakerJack

FilmmakerJack
  • Guests

Posted 14 May 2005 - 03:30 AM

Hey, I'm shooting a day shot. There's adequate lighting from the sun and if it were completely outdoors, I think I would be fine. However, my character is in a car. I was wondering what were some thoughts as to what I should do to fix the lighting, or if it should be good enough to shoot for a more natural feel.
  • 0

#2 Gareth Munden

Gareth Munden
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London UK

Posted 14 May 2005 - 05:55 AM

Hi , why not shoot some 35mm still photos as a test ? Ask in a camera store for a film with similair props as the 16mm film you are using .
Take white card etc , to bounch light back into faces etc .
  • 0

#3 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 14 May 2005 - 08:16 AM

Hey, I'm shooting a day shot. There's adequate lighting from the sun and if it were completely outdoors, I think I would be fine. However, my character is in a car. I was wondering what were some thoughts as to what I should do to fix the lighting, or if it should be good enough to shoot for a more natural feel.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


You should base your exposure on the main subject (the character in the car). But unless you try to balance the lighting and control contrast, it's likely things outside the car will be quite washed out. If you are using negative film, its superior highlight latitude may keep a bit more detail in the highlights, whereas the really bright areas may "clip" on video. In either case, a big part of cinematography is controlling the light.
  • 0

#4 Adam Frisch FSF

Adam Frisch FSF
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2027 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, USA

Posted 14 May 2005 - 08:33 AM

My personal opinion is that overblown exteriors in car windows aren't very pleasing. If the car is stationary all you need is a reflector. This can be a white board or cupboard-door draped in tin foil - whatever. Another good trick is negative fill to increase contrast - I have many times draped a big black tarp over the windows not in shot to create a more contrasty look.
  • 0

#5 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 20074 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 14 May 2005 - 09:13 AM

If you absolutely can't light the car, or bouce anything, try driving so that the background is backlit; this allows you to open up more for the shadows, exposure-wise. Even better, drive backlit with a dark green background like trees.
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Visual Products

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

CineLab

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks