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Documentary on super 16mm question


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#1 Roman

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 08:16 AM

I am planning to film a Capoeira documentary (Capoeira is a fascinating, ultra fast Brazilian martial art and dance). Will try to combine:
- some old b/w footage with some fictional footage that should have ?old? feel, like is fifty, hundred years old,
- docu footage of interwievs and action.

We?ll be filmming mostly outdoors on a bright sunny days. High speed (60 ? 75 fps) is a must given the speed of movements I would like to show in a slow motion.

Intent of the film is to be sold as a DVD but I?d like to show it on a few festivals also. I am mulling over the budget :( and maybe super 16mm and ARRIFLEX 16 SR 3 are my best options for the purpose intended?

And, yes, what would be the best option to record the sound for pure docu parts (interviews, host talking)?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Edited by Roman, 14 May 2005 - 08:16 AM.

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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 01:05 PM

Hi,

Given that your output is DVD, it strikes me that a Varicam would be a lot easier - and dozens of times cheaper, particularly for a documentary.

Phil
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#3 Mark Lyon

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 03:30 PM

I think the SR3 or Aaton XTR Prod would be a good choice, and 7245 (for sunny exteriors) or perhaps 7212 for the lowest-grain look you can get in Super 16. One way to save money would be to use HD video on the interviews, particularly if you have a high degree of control over the lighting, you might be able to get away with HD for them. If they're going to be outside and sunny too, then definitely super 16 for them too if you can afford it.

We always record location audio to DAT, but you might also look into the new hard disk recording systems.

Best of luck--sounds like a great project.

Mark Lyon
Mighty Max Films
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#4 Roman

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 06:33 PM

Given that your output is DVD, it strikes me that a Varicam would be a lot easier - and dozens of times cheaper, particularly for a documentary.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I am preparing budgets from DVCAM to 35mm :D so Varicam is one of options also (I'm not aware of any DVD cameras that can increase the speed...). do you have experience shooting 24 fps with it?
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#5 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 08:54 PM

Hi,

Yeah, well, 25, and 40, and 60...

Phil
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