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BOLEX MOTORS


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#1 Steven Budden

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 10:16 PM

Hello,

I'm working with a Bolex SBM which I'm about to have converted to Super. Anyway, I'm researching motors right now. Any suggestions? There is a bolex motor which looks nice, and the new Tobin motor coming out in July, only that is "installed" and doesn't allow for camera winding. That seems to defeat the purpose of having a wind up camera... I would have gotten an EL or an EBM.

So I'm looking for a motor that I can remove with ease, that can be used for synch, and maybe even for animation if there is one that can do all of the above. Any suggestions appreciated.

Thanks!

Sincerely,

Steven
San Francisco
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#2 Ian Marks

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 12:50 AM

Steven, Clive Tobin's motor is the only way to go. I'm not aware of any new Tobin motor coming out in July, unless maybe you mean that a new batch will be ready in July. Anyway, the Tobin isn't "installed" in the sense that you think - you simply remove the winding crank (it simply screws off), flip the lever which disengages the clockwork motor, and screw the little bugger into the side of the camera using the holes Bolex has thoughtfully provided for just such a purpose. If you want to go back to winding, remove the motor, reengage the internal motor, and reattach the winding crank. Should be a very quick job.

You might not realize that the MST and ESM motors Bolex makes aren't crystal synch, but the Tobin is, and it uses the industry-standard 12v power supply and XLR connector. There's tons of info on the Tobin website. Just my 2 cents.
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#3 Steven Budden

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 02:35 AM

Steven, Clive Tobin's motor is the only way to go. I'm not aware of any new Tobin motor coming out in July, unless maybe you mean that a new batch will be ready in July. Anyway, the Tobin isn't "installed" in the sense that you think - you simply remove the winding crank (it simply screws off), flip the lever which disengages the clockwork motor, and screw the little bugger into the side of the camera using the holes Bolex has thoughtfully provided for just such a purpose. If you want to go back to winding, remove the motor, reengage the internal motor, and reattach the winding crank. Should be a very quick job.

You might not realize that the MST and ESM motors Bolex makes aren't crystal synch, but the Tobin is, and it uses the industry-standard 12v power supply and XLR connector. There's tons of info on the Tobin website.  Just my 2 cents.

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Helpful, thanks!

Yeah, I was confused on the tobin thing. Really? There is a crystal synch bolex motor right? I thought I came across one somewhere. It has the jack in the back for the synch pulse.

Check this one out. It is time lapse and synch. Anyone have any experience with it? http://www.ncspro.co...bolex/index.stm

Looks beautiful but a little pricy at $900 ish.
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#4 Ian Marks

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Posted 15 May 2005 - 10:41 AM

The Bolex ESM and MST motors are electronically regulated - you would need to plug in an accessory crystal module to achieve true crystal sync. The Tobin motor (I was referring to the model with the "20" in its designation in my earlier post, by the way) is a crystal sync motor as it comes from the factory, where it is assembled by Northwestern Forest Sprites (the Bolex products are assembled by Swiss Gnomes).

I also like the Tobin motor because it's smallish and (relatively) inexpensive, and will work fine when powered by an inexpensive battery, which to me is in keeping with the Bolex's low-cost, DIY sensibility. Note that the more stuff you attach to your SBM (magazines, motors, etc.) the less ergonomic the whole thing becomes.
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#5 NCSProducts

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 10:40 AM

Check this one out. It is time lapse and synch. Anyone have any experience with it?  http://www.ncspro.co...bolex/index.stm

Looks beautiful but a little pricy at $900 ish.

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Posted Image

Sometimes you only have to pay twice as much to get the very best! :)

Ok, well maybe that's not really true. To match the capabilities of the Revolution Bolex you'd have to get the tobin 3-speed motor, add the videoframe controller, and then spend $4k for the Norris intervalometer. That would add up to $4,800

So it's about 1/4 the price. But then the Revolution is still a far better motor <_<

As a sync motor, it's a much better design then the tobin motor. Direct-drive, maintenance-free, no gears or spring-loaded dodads, just one moving part--the motor shaft.

Sync speeds from 1-48fps plus 23.976 and 29.970 and the lowest power consumption (can even run it from an AA battery pack).

On top of all that, its timelapse capabilities are far greater then the $4K norris.

There's Nice demo (upper left link) just posted that wasn't 100% shot with the Revolution, but it could have been (at least the 16mm parts).

- Dom
NCS Products, New York
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#6 Steven Budden

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Posted 20 May 2005 - 01:56 PM

Posted Image

Sometimes you only have to pay twice as much to get the very best! :)

Ok, well maybe that's not really true.  To match the capabilities of the Revolution Bolex you'd have to get the tobin 3-speed motor, add the videoframe controller, and then spend $4k for the Norris intervalometer.  That would add up to $4,800

So it's about 1/4 the price.  But then the Revolution is still a far better motor  <_<

As a sync motor, it's a much better design then the tobin motor.  Direct-drive, maintenance-free, no gears or spring-loaded dodads, just one moving part--the motor shaft. 

Sync speeds from 1-48fps plus 23.976 and 29.970 and the lowest power consumption (can even run it from an AA battery pack).

On top of all that, its timelapse capabilities are far greater then the $4K norris. 

There's Nice demo (upper left link) just posted that wasn't 100% shot with the Revolution, but it could have been (at least the 16mm parts).

- Dom
NCS Products, New York

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Dom,

Damn. And I just ordered a tobin. I sure like to learn things the hard/ expensive way.

Thanks for the demo, I got a lot of ideas from it.
The revolution looks a little clunky compared to the Tobin... is it? I've never seen it in person. I guess all those perks are worth a little more girth. Some of those skateboard scenes are surpsingly professional looking. You could make a low budged Matrix with the Revolution!

Steven
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#7 Steven Budden

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 12:08 PM

The new Tobin is 26B, works with old and new bolex's. It just came out recently. I guess it's supposed to be slightly quieter than the 20 because of a gear system change. But mostly its a little cheaper and can fit any bolex so probably has a higher resell value.

As for the revolution... couldn't you use a Tobin synch motor and a Tobin intervalometer and get most of the same effects?

Anyone have any negative or positive bolex synch motor stories?

Steven
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#8 Steven Budden

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Posted 26 May 2005 - 01:04 PM

Also, how quiet is the revolution for synch work?

Steven
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