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This month in AC...


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#1 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 10:03 PM

FYI...this month's issue of American Cinematographer features a lovely article written by the forum's own Phil Rhodes.  It discusses the short film, Puzzled in the "Short Takes" section (P. 14.)

 

Check it out!


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#2 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 06:06 PM

Nice! Congrats Phil!!
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#3 Miguel Angel

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 07:30 PM

Is it the April one or the May one? 
I have not received the April one yet! :( 


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#4 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 23 April 2015 - 10:15 AM

It's in the May issue.


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#5 Miguel Angel

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 07:58 PM

I will receive it in July probably! :D 

 

Looking forward to reading it tho!

 

Have a good day. 


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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 08:17 PM

Nice article, Phil!


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#7 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 08:45 PM

On another note, check the film out online.  It's a cute short.

 

It's free to watch: http://oliverkember.com/films/puzzled/


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#8 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 10:15 PM

I have a son who used to solve from almost any Rubex Cube start point in about 30 or 40 seconds. It's like watching undercranked footage. A window to another experience? The film makers didn't know this stuff, or weren't interested enough in it. But the wierd finickety magic of solving the cube at high speed is compelling. When one sees it.

There's a lot of interesting texture and color in the very British environments, but it's as though all is lit by a very grey sky, lacking in extremes. The theme, motif, light, all a bit grey or overmodulated for me. And this is a comment on what the film makers were looking for, were able to see, not what they were looking at.
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#9 Miguel Angel

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 08:18 AM

I liked the short - film. 

 

Looking forward to reading Phil's article now!

 

Have a good day!. 


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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 09:48 AM

Not actually my first-published, as I recall. Thanks for noticing.

 

P


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#11 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 10:11 AM

The film makers didn't know this stuff, or weren't interested enough in it. 

There's a lot of interesting texture and color in the very British environments, but it's as though all is lit by a very grey sky, lacking in extremes. The theme, motif, light, all a bit grey or overmodulated for me. And this is a comment on what the film makers were looking for, were able to see, not what they were looking at.

The point of the story is that he's not solving the cube.

 

As the weather in the UK is very often overcast, it's not surprising that the film has a slightly flat, low contrast look, which the film-makers chose to enhance for a period look.


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#12 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 12:19 PM

Also, if you read the article, the director/DP states that he was going for the overcast, English look.  And considering it was shot over a single weekend, I think it's pretty solid work.


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#13 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 04:33 PM

Phil, I seem to recall another article by you in a previous issue. Anyway, you're a fine writer so keep up the good work!
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#14 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 05:28 PM

Well, it's all good fun.


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#15 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 27 April 2015 - 09:02 PM

 

The point of the story is that he's not solving the cube.
 
As the weather in the UK is very often overcast, it's not surprising that the film has a slightly flat, low contrast look, which the film-makers chose to enhance for a period look.

 
Ah, my bad. I hadn't noticed that. I saw the pile of cubes as his trophies.

I think the film is more directed to you than to me. I hope for too much from it. It's unfair of me. I enjoyed the film actually. But is it great? What, conceptually, is at risk? Is it too safe? And by what standards should we assess that?

The weather in England is grey, so the film should look low contrast? How lame is that? Do the film makers have an opinion? Are they just making observation (of the weather)? When we make observation, what are we looking at?

What are we looking at? Even if we bring the most culturally constrained sort of concepts to our moment of seeing, should we allow something broader? Or not? England is grey, so the pallet should be well modulated. Where is the room here for originality?

Let's suppose that the idea of the kid cheating was one of the initial concepts/kernels of idea that the creators hung on to. The notion of real Rubex Cube genius is still interesting, and a source of astonishing images. But then, that would imply a narrative that wasn't "overmodulated", meaning that it's excitement wasn't dampened between between limits that are too close.

The sky in England may be grey, but the imaginations of the film makers need not be

Sorry if any spelling errors, no time to check it.
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#16 Mark Kenfield

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Posted 28 April 2015 - 01:06 AM

Phil's article? I've seen it. It's rubbish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

:D


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#17 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 28 April 2015 - 01:07 AM

Ah, my bad. I hadn't noticed that. I saw the pile of cubes as his trophies.I think the film is more directed to you than to me. I hope for too much from it. It's unfair of me. I enjoyed the film actually. But is it great? What, conceptually, is at risk? Is it too safe? And by what standards should we assess that?The weather in England is grey, so the film should look low contrast? How lame is that? Do the film makers have an opinion? Are they just making observation (of the weather)? When we make observation, what are we looking at?What are we looking at? Even if we bring the most culturally constrained sort of concepts to our moment of seeing, should we allow something broader? Or not? England is grey, so the pallet should be well modulated. Where is the room here for originality?Let's suppose that the idea of the kid cheating was one of the initial concepts/kernels of idea that the creators hung on to. The notion of real Rubex Cube genius is still interesting, and a source of astonishing images. But then, that would imply a narrative that wasn't "overmodulated", meaning that it's excitement wasn't dampened between between limits that are too close.The sky in England may be grey, but the imaginations of the film makers need not beSorry if any spelling errors, no time to check it.


There are times for analysis, and there are times to just kick back and enjoy a film.
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